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Resolving Conflicts With Tech: 10 Strategies in Child Support Case Management

As a child support case manager, you play a pivotal role in ensuring children receive the support they need. However, managing child support cases can be complex, with many parties involved and the potential for conflicts. Fortunately, technology offers innovative...
by Casebook Editorial Team 15 min read
by Casebook Editorial Team 11 min read

What Is Intensive Case Management?

by Maryellen Hess Cameron 15 min read

How Can Workflows Support Home Visits?

Using Data for Enhanced Nonprofit Performance: Insights and Strategies

Whitepaper, Driving Nonprofit Impact With Data and Technology, synthesizes the findings from a survey Executive Directors of 27 agencies in human services.Survey Insights Data Utilization The survey illuminates a crucial gap, with 73% of agencies underutilizing data in...
by Casebook Editorial Team 7 min read

AI Tools for Human Services Nonprofits

Following are some AI tools for you to consider. There are many others available as well. These solutions will take some of the heavy lift off staff so your organization, and those you serve, can thrive! AI Solutions - Administrative With these tools, you can easily...
by Casebook Editorial Team 13 min read

Buy or Build Your Own Case Management System for Human Services?

You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making...
by Andrew Pelletier 20 min read

Best Practices

The Ultimate Guide to Grant Funding Success

UPDATED for 2024: Discover best practices to securing grant funding with our comprehensive guide. From identifying opportunities to crafting winning proposals, we cover everything you need to succeed.

Download now and start your journey towards grant funding success.

Secure Your Funding Pt. 3 — Emphasis On The Data

So far, we’ve reviewed watchdog sites’ standards, detailing indicators for a nonprofit’s success, and articulating metrics. What do all of these have in common? DATA! Ratings, program development, case-making…all are driven by a drumbeat of qualitative and quantitative data. How the public v...

Reporting Impact and Communicating to Grant Funders

The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

Capacity-Building Grants | Nonprofit Case Studies

In the previous post, we touched on how capacity-building grants are identified and developed in an effort to better position organizations for growth. Now, we’ll review the power of capacity-building g...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

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Latest Blogs

What Does a Police Social Worker Do?

Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are re...
Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve. Counseling and Crisis Response Support Police social workers complement the efforts of law enforcement officers, expanding the services provided by local police and sheriff’s departments. According to ZipRecruiter, they “provide counseling and crisis response support for community members who are referred by police officers.” They can be employed by various law enforcement organizations or by social service agencies that partner with law enforcement. Crisis social work is often challenging and risky, although it’s valuable and potentially very rewarding as well. In addition to providing support for domestic violence and substance abuse victims, police social workers collaborate with first-responders to negotiate with distressed individuals. They counsel those who are grieving for lost loved ones and develop programs for at-risk youth. To facilitate their own efforts, they also provide counseling to police officers and their families, as well as training programs to address: Stress management Mental illness Substance abuse Domestic violence Child abuse A lot can happen in just one shift doing this type of social work. Unpredictable events are a common occurrence. The intense demands of the job are enough to test anyone’s mettle. Nonetheless, your role as a police social worker would be to act as a stabilizing force in the midst of what are often chaotic and dangerous situations. This job calls for poise and resilience that characterize remarkably few people — that’s why there’s such a great need for them. A Bridge to Essential Resources The police social worker's function as a civilian crisis responder places them in a unique position — much like a bridge to vital resources that people could desperately need. People seeking help may require counseling beyond a police officer’s abilities, and so would potentially need referrals for treatment. Children and other vulnerable people may respond differently to unarmed social workers than to police officers, so providing police social workers creates additional essential resources to help cover gaps in the system. These workers effectively enhance the overall breadth of services provided by law enforcement and crisis response officials. They often make follow-up calls that police officers can’t commit to as they’re typically responding to high-priority dispatches. Plus, they help connect people to the services and available resources they need. It would be difficult to overstate the value these workers provide to their clients, the agencies they work with, and the communities they serve.
by Casebook Editorial Team 8 min read

Data Security: Why Does Client Privacy Matter?

Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential ...
Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page. Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: Intro 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters 6 Reasons Why Client Privacy Matters Client privacy rests atop the list of considerations that social workers, case managers, and human services professionals must make throughout the course of their day-to-day activities. With all the private information being passed around, it can be easy to lose sight of why keeping it confidential is vitally important. So why does client privacy matter to your organization? Here are six reasons that make client privacy the driving concern of dedicated human services professionals all over the world: 1. Protecting clients’ rights Every individual has a fundamental right to keep their personal information confidential and to make decisions about their own lives. Respecting these rights is among the many responsibilities of a human services professional. To honor the rights of your clients, you must protect their privacy as an integral part of your duties. Confidentiality and privacy are absolutely essential to ensure that your clients’ rights and dignity are respected. That’s why having a secure information management system is a bare necessity. Many human services organizations are finding software-as-a-service (SaaS) providers to be the solution that’s needed to protect client privacy while embracing a shift to the more efficient and reliable digital systems currently supplanting the manual processes of the past. 2. Securing sensitive information Your clients’ sensitive information could be potentially harmful if misused. Maintaining its confidentiality is of tremendous importance to prevent any such harm from taking place. Social workers and case managers working with sensitive documents like mental health diagnoses, financial information, or criminal histories have a firm responsibility to keep those materials from being exposed to anyone who’s not authorized to access them. Neglecting this responsibility may result in a data breach that could damage the reputations of the people and organizations involved. Your information management system must therefore have the proper controls in place to ensure the security of your clients’ data. By using a SaaS platform like Casebook to manage client data, you can control who has access to your client notes without limiting any of your users’ access to cases. For example, if you had volunteers performing data entry for new clients, they would need access to basic case information but shouldn’t be able to see any confidential client information in the case notes. In that kind of situation, a "locking notes” feature can be vital for client data security. 3. Growing and reinforcing trust Trust is a crucial component of the relationship between human services professionals and the people they serve. Your clients need to feel comfortable sharing their personal information with the social workers, case managers, and other service providers who need it. Taking steps to protect your clients’ privacy and maintain confidentiality builds trust and helps to establish a better environment for your clients to share their needs and concerns. When people know that their personal data is kept private, they’re far more likely to trust their service providers and to share important sensitive information that’s needed to properly care for them. Without that trust, your clients may not feel comfortable providing you with that information, which could prevent you from uncovering the insights you need to serve them. The integral component of your clients’ trust in you stands as a clear reminder of why client privacy matters. 4. Upholding ethical and legal obligations Human services professionals are bound by ethical and legal obligations concerning their clients' privacy. Local, state, national, and international organizations set various regulations and standards for privacy, and may enforce them as well. The National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics, for one, requires social workers to “respect and protect the confidentiality of clients” and to “obtain client consent before disclosing confidential information.” Not only are there multiple entities whose client privacy standards you may have to meet, but different standards apply to the various kinds of client information that you might have. For example, in the US, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) sets standards for protecting the privacy of personal health information. Compliance with HIPAA and other similar regulations is another factor your organization has to consider when choosing a system for managing your client data. How client data is captured, stored, transferred, and used is given particular weight by many regulatory frameworks as organizations across the continuum of care place a growing emphasis on bolstering their cybersecurity. To remain within the law, your organization must follow the rules for client privacy that apply to it. By meeting those ethical and legal obligations that support client privacy, you can avoid damaging legal repercussions and ethical dilemmas that could harm your clients and your organization. Therefore, it's imperative that you understand and adhere to the regulations and standards for client privacy that are governed by the various organizations at all municipal levels. 5. Supporting business objectives In addition to ethical and legal obligations, certain business considerations make client privacy a key part of human services. Anyone who feels that using your services could put their privacy at risk may not be likely to seek them. And even if they do, they might not feel inclined to disclose information to your organization that could be important or even necessary to provide the care they need. This can drastically affect the quality of care, as well as your organization’s reputation and value. However, ensuring that your clients feel their personal information remains safe and confidential in the hands of your organization can contribute significantly to its image within the larger community. By making privacy a priority, your organization can build a positive reputation through the strong word of mouth of clients who trust that you’ll protect their sensitive data. Furthermore, looking beyond the question of why client privacy matters, SaaS platforms like Casebook can also support your business objectives by streamlining internal and external communication, automating repetitive processes, and making report generation a quicker and easier task. The resulting increases in efficiency and client satisfaction can help bolster your organization’s profile even more. 6. Promoting social stability Protecting client privacy is also important for defending human rights and social justice. People have a fundamental right to privacy, and social work, case management, and human services have a responsibility to respect and support this right. By ensuring client privacy, your organization can play a leading role in addressing power imbalances and preventing discrimination, which can improve the health and stability of human relations. People who don’t feel their right to privacy is respected may lose confidence in those who try to help them, creating a destabilizing effect on society. On the other hand, when individuals and communities have access to services that protect their privacy, they’re more likely to look for help when it’s needed and to engage in activities that encourage their wellbeing. This can contribute to the creation of stronger, more resilient communities and a more stable society. Building Value for the Community Overall, client privacy is an essential component of social work, case management, and human services. More than just a legal and ethical requirement of human services professionals, client privacy is a fundamental human right that promotes the health of society. Additionally, protecting your clients' sensitive information builds critical trust and helps establish an environment that lets them be comfortable sharing their needs and concerns. By embracing SaaS solutions such as Casebook, human services organizations are choosing to secure their client data, enhance communication, automate essential processes, and produce reports more efficiently, contributing significantly to the effectiveness of their operations as well as their value within the community at large. Privacy, therefore, is not only a moral obligation but also a key driver of business success and social stability. To learn more about safeguarding client privacy through your choice of software, check out this web page.
by Casebook Editorial Team 28 min read

3 Simple Ways Going Paperless Improves Data Security

If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential docume...
If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data.
by Joshua Cruz 7 min read

Casebook's Adaptive Model Of Support

One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community tha...
One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net One of the benefits of my job is that I’m continually introduced to organizations making a big impact in their corner of the world. Like a good parent says: "They are all my favorites." The truth is, some stand out more than others for their unique approaches or forgotten niches of the community that they reach. One of these organizations that left an indelible imprint on my mind was a particular nonprofit in the midwest that provides support to families who have a child who recently received an epilepsy diagnosis. This organization provided wraparound support services for the families and the individual children. Their goal was to meet families in the hospitals as soon as they received the epilepsy diagnosis and then give them a plan moving forward. Most of all, they gave the families hope and community that was desperately needed. These are the heroes we all need at different times in our lives. Before reaching out to Casebook, this organization was using a donor management platform to document their interactions with the families. This only partially worked the way they needed it. Eventually, it became clear that their current solution wasn’t going to cover all their needs, so they began the search for a case management solution. Whenever I have the opportunity to show someone the Casebook Platform, I make sure I understand a bit about the unique services that they’re providing for the community. I want to make sure that the Casebook I’m presenting most closely aligns with the Casebook they need. With our adaptive model, the Casebook platform is able to help multiple types of organizations serving diverse people groups. In studying this particular organization, I noticed that the individuals going into the hospitals to meet the families were trained volunteers. While these volunteers needed to document their visits with the hurting families, they most certainly did not need access to Casebook and the personal information the database houses. I was elated to show them that our product team has designed functionality for this specific need: email into case. Every case record that’s created has a unique email address automatically assigned to that particular record. If you give volunteers or external partnership organizations that unique email address, the content of that email will populate within the case notes section. This way, a group leader or a teacher may be able to update you, the caseworker, on notable aspects of the individual’s life that you otherwise would have no idea about. In regards to the Epilepsy Services organization, this supplied the perfect solution for a problem causing great consternation in their daily efforts. Now they are able to continue with their current model of outreach while not having to pay any extra subscription or functionality fees. It’s stories like this that remind me how grateful I am for the solutions we’re offering to help the helpers. Maybe your organization has been looking for a similar solution that allows collaboration on case records from individuals outside of your organization. In a normal circumstance, it would be impossible to allow this collaboration while still keeping data secure and HIPAA compliant. Now that solution exists, and it is in Casebook. Drew Pelletier Solutions Consultant andrew.pelletier@casebook.net
by Andrew Pelletier 11 min read

Understanding the CCWIS Final Rule

On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle throug...
On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches. On June 2, 2016, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) issued a final Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule to replace the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule, which for more than twenty years had been the vehicle through which states sought federal assistance for funding child welfare technology efforts. This brief provides our analysis of the final rule and its implications for states and tribes seeking to modernize their technology portfolios. Note: States should consult with ACF regarding definitive interpretations of the rule. CCWIS as a Force for Innovation A key purpose of the CCWIS rule is to specify how states and tribes may obtain federal financial participation (FFP) for a CCWIS project. As with S/TACWIS, ACF determines CCWIS compliance through review and approval of a state’s or tribe’s Advance Planning Document (APD) or a Notice of Intent (for projects below the APD threshold), as well as through periodic federal monitoring. The rule does not change the APD process or the FFP rate, which remains at 50% of project costs. CCWIS, like its predecessor, is optional for states and tribes. The nature of what qualifies as a “project,” however, has changed significantly with CCWIS. Under the old S/TACWIS rules, FFP was only available to a state or tribe that developed and operated a single, large system that all public and private child welfare workers used. Moreover, ACF mandated fifty-one distinct functions that any such monolithic S/TACWIS system had to support. Under the new CCWIS rule, ACF does not specify such functional requirements. Instead, IV-E agencies are encouraged to innovate in keeping with their individual needs and practices. For example, states and tribes may obtain FFP to build smaller, more modular subsets of functionality aligned with their practice models, or perhaps with an incremental legacy system replacement plan. They might choose to obtain certain types of data through automated integrations rather than collect it within the child welfare application itself. From an implementation perspective, they might opt for a project approach based on modern Agile software development techniques, as California and other states have done. The states’ early responses to CCWIS—as embodied in procurements issued around the time the final rule was released—have already shown an eagerness to experiment with such new approaches.
by Sample HubSpot User 8 min read

cb Reporting: Data That Matters

Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensu...
Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p> Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Ilana Novick is a journalist and writer based in New York City. Her writing has appeared in Vice, AlterNet,.... Evaluation, reporting, and data management are a necessary part of life in the social services field. Funders want to measure the impact of their donations, licensing agencies need to ensure professional standards are met, and managers need to track staff and program progress to achieve organizational goals. For organizations without dedicated data staff however, reporting can be expensive, time consuming, and a drain on teams hired to serve their communities, not crunch numbers. Casebook’s new cb Reporting feature can help. With multiple pre-built reports and out-of-the-box dashboards, it’s easy to start gathering and analyzing data immediately. The dashboards are like the front page of cb Reporting, capturing a snapshot of key metrics an organization is tracking at a given time. The pre-built reports allow users to dig deeper on the information managers, funders, and other stakeholders might require as part of evaluation and fundraising. “Casebook's reporting capabilities are intended for all people in the human services field,” said Ninad Amondikar, Data Product Manager at Casebook PBC, and for organizations of all sizes. Dashboards and pre-built reports don’t require extensive knowledge of data analysis. “Someone who may not have any comfort with data can go into cb Reporting and leverage our library of pre-built reports,” Amondikar added. “It reduces the time that agency supervisors and program administrators spend time setting up reports. The upfront investment required is minimal.” cb Reporting works in collaboration with the rest of Casebook’s product suite, taking data from the other modules, and turning them into customizable reports, covering the entire lifecycle of case management, which is critical for building comprehensive reports. These reports and dashboards were created with the most essential human services reporting needs in mind. Reports are pre-built however, this doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for customization. If an organization wants to run a report that includes some but not all of the metrics in a pre-built one, they can simply filter out the information they don’t need with the click of a button. If, for example, a manager wants to filter a particular report by race but not age, they can un-click the checkbox for age. Or, if a funder requests a specific new datapoint, it can be easily added. Users can save the changes for easy access in the future. This frees workers to continue their work in the field, using Casebook’s data entry system, while managers and administrators can easily track what’s happening without hovering over their staff's shoulders or attempting to be in multiple places at once. Dashboards and pre-built reports are also important for grant reporting. As Amondikar explained, “the majority of our users, and the organizations that we work with, are grant funded. And grant funding can vary based on the type of activities that they do, and their requirements for reporting impact can vary based on the funder itself.” With pre-built reports, organizations can easily start reporting out how their activities are meeting grant requirements. Whether funders want stats on service delivery, demographics, client interactions, or any other data, reports and dashboards take the stress out of data collection, analysis and reporting for organizations of any size./p>
by Ilana Novick 13 min read

The Priority to Combat Staff Turnover in Social Services: Leadership Development

Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll ...
Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services? Welcome back to the second part in a two-part series on combating staff turnover in social services. Previously we talked about the budget dilemmas that typically put the least experienced and least paid staff on the frontlines, spending most of their time with the clients. Moreover, the heavy toll often inflicted on frontline social service workers means turnover is a common recurrence. If you work in social services, then you've seen this play out time and time again. If you find yourself an administrator in social services, you know it's a problem that is not easy to solve. Taking lessons from military service, I'm going to submit to you that small unit participatory leadership must focus on leadership development in social services. Only here can you infuse the necessary experience and leadership to ensure turnover does not harm client outcomes. So let's jump right in. Learn the Lessons of Leadership and Gallantry When you take a brief survey of military recipients of the Medal of Honor, you'll notice a recurring theme. Namely, you don't see a good number of high ranking officers in the mix. Certainly, there are some, but by and large, you will see lower-ranking enlisted men and junior officers as the norm. That's because actions that require inexplicable gallantry occur on the frontlines rather than in the rear with the gear. So it is for social services and the inexplicable fortitude that is required to tackle some of our nation's most pressing human services problems. Every nonprofit executive or board is heavily involved in the strategic planning process, but very few will spend the majority of their time on the frontline. This is right and appropriate as both the executive and board serve very specific functions. However, for the strategic plan to become a reality in terms of client outcomes, an organization must be dedicated to creating a talented core of small unit leaders that are both empowered and accountable. Once again, let's a look at the military for some guidance. If You Can't Beat High Turnover, then Control the Ground Game. Though it varies by service branch, reenlistment rates in the United States military can vary between 26% to 47%, based on a recent 2008 study. What that means is that approximately 74% to 53% of the military workforce is done after their first contract, which typically ranges from 4 to 6 years. Meaning that just when a military service member really knows what they are doing, they are gone only to be replaced by the next generation of inexperienced workers. Does that sound familiar to anyone in social services?
by Jeff Edwards 9 min read

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