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Resolving Conflicts With Tech: 10 Strategies in Child Support Case Management

As a child support case manager, you play a pivotal role in ensuring children receive the support they need. However, managing child support cases can be complex, with many parties involved and the potential for conflicts. Fortunately, technology offers innovative...
by Casebook Editorial Team 15 min read

Using Data for Enhanced Nonprofit Performance: Insights and Strategies

Whitepaper, Driving Nonprofit Impact With Data and Technology, synthesizes the findings from a survey Executive Directors of 27 agencies in human services.Survey Insights Data Utilization The survey illuminates a crucial gap, with 73% of agencies underutilizing data in...
by Casebook Editorial Team 7 min read

AI Tools for Human Services Nonprofits

Following are some AI tools for you to consider. There are many others available as well. These solutions will take some of the heavy lift off staff so your organization, and those you serve, can thrive! AI Solutions - Administrative With these tools, you can easily...
by Casebook Editorial Team 13 min read

Buy or Build Your Own Case Management System for Human Services?

You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making...
by Andrew Pelletier 20 min read

Best Practices

The Ultimate Guide to Grant Funding Success

UPDATED for 2024: Discover best practices to securing grant funding with our comprehensive guide. From identifying opportunities to crafting winning proposals, we cover everything you need to succeed.

Download now and start your journey towards grant funding success.

Secure Your Funding Pt. 3 — Emphasis On The Data

So far, we’ve reviewed watchdog sites’ standards, detailing indicators for a nonprofit’s success, and articulating metrics. What do all of these have in common? DATA! Ratings, program development, case-making…all are driven by a drumbeat of qualitative and quantitative data. How the public v...

Reporting Impact and Communicating to Grant Funders

The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

Capacity-Building Grants | Nonprofit Case Studies

In the previous post, we touched on how capacity-building grants are identified and developed in an effort to better position organizations for growth. Now, we’ll review the power of capacity-building g...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

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Latest Blogs

Buy or Build Your Own Case Management System for Human Services?

You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to p...
You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list.
by Andrew Pelletier 20 min read

Single vs Multi-Tenant SaaS Architecture for Your Human Services Organization

The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structur...
The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization. The two types of cloud architecture have different structures and offer various advantages and disadvantages for your human services organization. Whether your organization is a nonprofit, private enterprise, or public sector agency, you will want to familiarize yourself with these distinct structures as you consider the possibilities for SaaS. Differences Between Single-Tenant and Multi-Tenant SaaS At a basic level, the single-tenant architecture provides a single instance (piece) of software and its associated infrastructure to a single customer, whereas multi-tenant architecture serves multiple customers. As their names suggest, the two types of tenancy in SaaS architecture may be compared to different housing arrangements. In a single-tenant arrangement, as in a single-family home, the customer owns the structure and everything in it. They are responsible for maintenance, repairs, and utilities, as well as more specialized requirements, such as security. Single-tenancy SaaS architecture supports one platform user running a single platform codebase on their website. With single tenancy, each customer has their own separate database and instance of the software. No sharing among tenants occurs with this option, as there is only one tenant. On the other hand, using multi-tenant software could be equated to living in an apartment building. Portions of the infrastructure are shared among tenants, yet each tenant has their own private "space." Compared to maintaining a house, renting an apartment comes with less cost and commitment, and includes ongoing services from providers. Similarly, your SaaS server provider handles the maintenance and upgrade process so you don’t have to. With multi-tenancy, the single instance of the software's codebase is shared between multiple users. In multi-tenant SaaS, each tenant's individual data remains discrete, unseen, and secure from other tenants, but they all share: Web servers Infrastructure services Database Memory Let's take a closer look at how single-tenancy and multi-tenancy environments differ, and how these differences may impact your human services organization. Cost Single-tenant architecture usually allows the customer more resources than does multi-tenant. But, since they're all dedicated to one customer, those resources can carry a hefty price tag. In a multi-tenant setup, the cost for the service is shared, and those savings are typically passed on to the customer. Public sector agencies, private enterprises, and nonprofits often work within tight budget constraints, making multi-tenancy a sensible option for many different types of human services organizations. Setup and Configuration Compared to a multi-tenant setup, single-tenant software will often demand more time and effort from your organization. It consumes more resources during setup and ongoing maintenance, requiring some level of customization to be implemented. Multi-tenant SaaS, conversely, allows for quick setups and light management. Customers can add data, users, and third-party integrations with relative ease in the multi-tenant environment, which is configurable to your organization's specific needs. Scalability and Efficiency Since resources in a single-tenant cloud are dedicated to one tenant, utilization is generally less efficient than in a multi-tenant cloud. Scalability can be a challenge with single-tenancy also, as customers are often operating with fixed resources. With multi-tenant architecture, resources are balanced across customers, leading to greater overall efficiency. A multi-tenant system can shift computing resources where they're needed, keeping vendor costs low and resulting in a scalable solution for your human services organization.
by Brian Johnson 11 min read

3 Simple Ways Going Paperless Improves Data Security

If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential docume...
If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data. If your organization's workflow process isn't paperless, you may be exposing yourself and your clients to easily avoidable security risks. There are many benefits of a paperless process, but you may not consider some basic ways in which relying on paper versions of forms, files, and essential documents leave your organization and clients potentially vulnerable. Here are three ways your organization can improve data security with a paperless process. Files Can't Be Misplaced or Lost Without filing cabinets full of paper forms, your team can't lose track of important documents, historical information, or miscategorize files. Digital forms and document upload allow for almost instant access to the information you need, improving efficiency - but also makes sure nothing is ever lost from a client file. Lost files or potential device exposure During home studies, facility inspection, or other out-of-office activities, your team could have sensitive information on paper files or device storage - potentially exposing your client and organization to liability. A digitized process in-the-field should include instant upload and sync to a secure cloud vs. hosting any data on the physical device storage. This allows for both better note-taking, data fidelity, and security for your client forms and scanned documents. When Crisis Strikes, it Won't Impact Your Data, Files or Workflow When crisis strikes you shouldn't be worried about your documents and sensitive client information being lost of exposed. Not having a digitized process leaves your organization's paper-based data liable to damage or destruction. Your insurance may cover your losses, but without an offsite server and data redundancy, you can't recover critical information lost to the disaster. Your data being safely on the cloud also means your team can get back to helping your clients, which is especially important during a time of uncertainty. Cloud-based data solutions mean your data is always safe, secure, available and reliable. If you'd like to know more about Casebook security or how to secure data in the cloud, you'll find that in 2020 you can't afford to place your organization and clients at risk by not investing in securing your data.
by Joshua Cruz 7 min read

Case management software that brings it all together.

Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or an...
Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it. Casebook has always emphasized working directly with practitioners when developing our platform. When we embarked on developing cb: Engage, we came to the drawing board with a research-focused approach. In recent interviews with practitioners, a recurring challenge mentioned was the difficulty or annoyance of toggling between different software programs, the potential pitfalls that presents, and how it's frustrating to switch gears to work on one case or record. A trend highlighted in multiple stakeholder interviews was how a user might go to one software for forms that need to be filled out or attached, switch to another software to write notes, and sometimes even a third software to update information about clients or service providers! This all adds up to quite a bit of time toggling, increases the possibility for errors, and is inefficient. When it comes to software buying, we've seen the pendulum swing back and forth between extremes: generalist vs. specialist, mobile browser-based or mobile native, all-in-one packages, or task-focused software. The last one, buying task-focused software for any industry, is currently a trend I see in human services. It is common to see small bits of software for things such as: Software for forms Software for note-taking Software for calendaring and prioritization of tasks CRM software for identifying people and contacts Teams are already overwhelmed by the amount of documentation they are required to complete for each case and the need to switch from one application to another to manage multiple cases. These interdependencies from various software applications can often lead to dangerous security gaps, increases in human errors, data sync irregularities, the need for revisions - not to mention dealing with the user experience and customer support from varying software suppliers. In the interest of making small wins by purchasing software to handle one small part of the case management process, leaders risk increasing headaches that social workers experience.Casebook designed software that simplifies how social services work by aggregating and organizing information that matches the way that practitioners need it.
by Casebook Editorial Team 7 min read

Casebook Security: Passwords, Permissions & Encryption

Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at leas...
Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho Everyone has personal information that can't get into the wrong hands. Whether you're in child welfare, workforce development, foster care, community services or any area helping others, working in the social services sector means the most sensitive parts of their lives are in your hands, or at least your case files. How you protect, store, and organize that data is critical for doing your job, and the right software can not only help you stay organized but keep your clients safe. That's where Casebook comes in. With Casebook, privacy and security features kick in the moment you open the software, with an extremely stringent password validation system, continuing with customizable permission levels that easily allow you to determine which staff members have access to what information, encrypts that data so it doesn't fall into the wrong hands, and updates the software on a frequent basis to stay ahead of any new challenges. Speaking of passwords, you can't use Casebook with a password as hackable as welcome123 or anything else as common. Casebook requires that users create passwords that, as Chief Technology Officer Jordan Jan explains, "are extremely hard to guess." In addition to the current strict password controls, he adds that "we are adding multi-factor authentication," providing an extra level of security to ensure users are who they say they are when they first sign in. Individual Permissions Even when authorized users are logged in, however, that doesn't mean every user has the same level of access to an organization's data. As Jan emphasizes, casebook security is based on an idea called the principle of least privilege, meaning that any user should have only the bare minimum level of access needed to complete their jobs, and any additional permissions and access are added as administrators see fit. Each organization decides for itself who should be the administrator that controls the level of access and roles for all employees using the platform. In Casebook, these roles are configurable, allowing variable permission levels that grant the ability to view, modify, create & delete data based on an organization's needs. In practice, this means an individual social worker might only have the ability to edit their own clients' information once the client has completed an intake. Still, they may only be able to view (and not edit) the intake information if another staff member completed the process if it's necessary to do their job. This customizability, Ashley McCullough, Service Delivery Manager at Casebook explains, "is key to data protection." She adds, "We also understand that each organization's privacy needs may be different." An administrative staff member involved in ensuring organizational licenses and certificates are up to date may be able to access those specific documents but not edit them, or only edit what their supervisor or administrator has deemed necessary. Administrators can also set permissions at different levels across different Casebook modules. A staff member might have supervisor access in, for example, the intake feature, but not in cb track, which covers onboarding, licensing, and inspections. Organizations can also adjust how information is labeled on the system. As an example, McCullough cites an anti-human trafficking organization who decided to forgo using real names in their Casebook casefiles, instead cho
by Ilana Novick 11 min read

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