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Resolving Conflicts With Tech: 10 Strategies in Child Support Case Management

As a child support case manager, you play a pivotal role in ensuring children receive the support they need. However, managing child support cases can be complex, with many parties involved and the potential for conflicts. Fortunately, technology offers innovative...
by Casebook Editorial Team 15 min read
by Casebook Editorial Team 11 min read

What Is Intensive Case Management?

by Maryellen Hess Cameron 15 min read

How Can Workflows Support Home Visits?

Using Data for Enhanced Nonprofit Performance: Insights and Strategies

Whitepaper, Driving Nonprofit Impact With Data and Technology, synthesizes the findings from a survey Executive Directors of 27 agencies in human services.Survey Insights Data Utilization The survey illuminates a crucial gap, with 73% of agencies underutilizing data in...
by Casebook Editorial Team 7 min read

AI Tools for Human Services Nonprofits

Following are some AI tools for you to consider. There are many others available as well. These solutions will take some of the heavy lift off staff so your organization, and those you serve, can thrive! AI Solutions - Administrative With these tools, you can easily...
by Casebook Editorial Team 13 min read

Buy or Build Your Own Case Management System for Human Services?

You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making...
by Andrew Pelletier 20 min read

Best Practices

The Ultimate Guide to Grant Funding Success

UPDATED for 2024: Discover best practices to securing grant funding with our comprehensive guide. From identifying opportunities to crafting winning proposals, we cover everything you need to succeed.

Download now and start your journey towards grant funding success.

Secure Your Funding Pt. 3 — Emphasis On The Data

So far, we’ve reviewed watchdog sites’ standards, detailing indicators for a nonprofit’s success, and articulating metrics. What do all of these have in common? DATA! Ratings, program development, case-making…all are driven by a drumbeat of qualitative and quantitative data. How the public v...

Reporting Impact and Communicating to Grant Funders

The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

Capacity-Building Grants | Nonprofit Case Studies

In the previous post, we touched on how capacity-building grants are identified and developed in an effort to better position organizations for growth. Now, we’ll review the power of capacity-building g...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

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10 Advocacy Strategies You Should Know For Your Upcoming Campaign

Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcomi...
Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most. Advocacy is a crucial part of generating real change as a social worker. Whether you are advocating for an individual client's rights or campaigning to implement wider reforms, having a strategic approach is key. This article outlines ten essential advocacy strategies to incorporate into your upcoming campaigns, from clearly defining your goals to leveraging compelling client testimonials.Implementing these evidence-based strategies will empower you to run campaigns that galvanize stakeholders, influence policymakers, and transform your clients' lives for the better. So, let's explore how you can become a more skilled, sophisticated advocate.Before diving into effective advocacy strategies in social work, it's important to cover some advocacy basics within the human services sector. At its core, advocacy means publicly supporting a particular cause, policy, or group of people. As an advocate, your overarching goal is to bring about positive change by raising awareness, influencing attitudes, and motivating action.Advocacy has always been fundamental to social work values and ethics. Both the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics and the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) emphasize the significance of advocacy. This involves speaking up for rights and services for individual clients, supporting vulnerable groups, and advocating for broader systemic reforms.As a social worker, you view clients and community groups from an empowerment perspective to help them speak out for themselves. But there are many scenarios where you will need to add your own voice, advocating directly on their behalf for access, equity, and justice.Whether you are a police social worker or case manager, your advocacy role is multifaceted, especially when it comes to supporting vulnerable clients. Advocacy plays a crucial role in improving the lives of these clients by addressing various challenges they may face. Here are some key aspects of the advocate's role when it comes to client support: Helping clients access essential services and resources: Advocates serve as a bridge between clients and the services and resources they need. It could involve assisting clients in navigating complex systems, such as healthcare or housing, and ensuring they have access to the support they require. Upholding clients' legal and human rights: You advocate for your clients' rights, ensuring they are treated with dignity and respect. It may involve challenging discriminatory practices, advocating for equal opportunities, or protecting clients from abuses or violations. Improving clients' quality of life: Advocacy efforts also aim to enhance the overall well-being of your clients. It could include advocating for improved healthcare services, better living conditions, or access to education and employment opportunities. By addressing these areas, you strive to improve the quality of life for your clients. Addressing wider barriers and inequalities facing clients: You recognize that the challenges faced by your clients often stem from broader systemic issues and inequalities. Therefore, as an advocate, you also work towards addressing these barriers at a systemic level, advocating for policy changes, and raising awareness about the structural reasons behind the challenges your clients face. All these factors make advocacy an essential skill set for social workers assisting disadvantaged groups. By actively advocating for your clients, you can significantly support and empower those who need it the most.
by Casebook Editorial Team 11 min read

A Case Manager's Guide to Social Impact Assessment

Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies....
Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups. Social impact assessment (SIA) has become an increasingly critical practice in the field of case management. As a case manager, you are uniquely positioned to drive positive social change through thoughtful SIA. This guide explores the importance of SIA, its key components, and practical strategies. Ultimately, this comprehensive overview empowers you to incorporate impact-driven approaches into your social work. The Importance of Social Impact Assessment SIA refers to the process of analyzing the social consequences of planned interventions, including policies, programs, and projects by both public and private sector organizations. As a case manager, you play a critical role in assessing and improving the social impact of programs like job training, housing assistance, and addiction counseling. Some key reasons why SIAs are vital include: Driving Social Change Through Evidence-Based Programs: A rigorous SIA provides the evidence needed to demonstrate that your programs are truly driving meaningful improvements in clients' lives. Rather than making vague claims about "changing lives," you can point to concrete metrics like "reduced chronic homelessness rates by 35%." It builds credibility amongst donors like United Way and government partners. Informing Decision-Making and Strategy: Tracking indicators through an SIA provides critical insights into what intervention strategies work and where improvements are needed. Analyzing disaggregated data can shed light on which client groups are benefiting more or less from particular services. It enables you to tweak your approach. Securing Ongoing Funding and Investment: Grantmakers want to support programs that make an impact. By consistently improving outcomes through your SIA, you provide donors with proof points to justify continued or expanded funding. Many government contracts mandate demonstrating actual social impact. The Role of Case Managers in Driving Positive Social Change As a case manager at a community action program, homeless shelter, or similar social service organization, you have a unique opportunity to drive meaningful and sustainable social impact. Unlike other roles, case managers develop direct, trusting relationships with vulnerable populations. You likely serve clients dealing with issues like poverty, addiction, abuse, hunger, unemployment, and more. The bond and empathy built from your one-on-one engagements allow for meaningful influence regarding the choices and trajectories of those individuals. To drive meaningful social change in your case manager role, focus on: Building clients' self-sufficiency through coaching and goal orientation. Help clients recognize their potential and put plans in place to achieve financial stability, healthy relationships, continuing education advancement, and more. Connecting clients to the vital resources they need, like SNAP benefits, affordable housing programs, job placement assistance, and free mental healthcare. Ensure they succeed in accessing social safety net programs. Listening to clients to fully understand barriers to success and co-create solutions. Let their direct voices shape more responsive services. Collecting data on client outcomes and satisfaction through effective SIA management. Coordinating across a multidisciplinary team and local partners. Try to develop a holistic continuum of care wrapped around each person. Promoting policy changes towards health equity and a just society. Rather than maintaining the status quo, you have an opportunity to create upward mobility for marginalized groups.
by Casebook Editorial Team 10 min read

Update Your Client Intake

In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human s...
In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources. In the human services industry, client intake is a central part of the process that sets the stage for successful service delivery. Without a thorough understanding of who the client is, what their needs are, and how to best serve them, it can be difficult to perform meaningful services. The human services industry has traditionally used paper-based client intakes. However, this method has its drawbacks, such as handwriting legibility issues, data accuracy problems, and difficulty in tracking changes. These issues can be minimized and even eliminated by utilizing digital client intake solutions, allowing for more accurate data collection, better readability, and the ability to engage with clients through technology. No More Paper for Intake While the traditional solution of paper-based client intakes has been dominant in the human services industry for many years, it has many disadvantages when compared to modern digital solutions. Not only will you save money and precious time spent dealing with paper-based client intakes, but you will also gain the additional advantage of being able to store and retrieve data more quickly and accurately. The following are some of the most common problems associated with paper intake forms. Inaccuracies Because paper-based intake forms are filled out by hand, it is easy for errors to be made. Examples include incorrect formatting (dates entered incorrectly) and difficult-to-interpret typos. These inaccuracies can lead to mistakes in subsequent steps of the client intake process, such as when it comes time to input the data into a system or when comparing client information across multiple intakes. Illegible Handwriting Another common issue with paper-based intake forms is illegible handwriting. When service providers have difficulty reading a client’s handwriting, they may make incorrect assumptions, struggle to understand the meaning behind certain answers, or overlook important information that could have been beneficial. This can lead to entering incorrect data into the system or redoing or throwing out the form altogether. Lost Data Paper-based intakes are prone to getting lost or misfiled, making it difficult to keep track of all the client data. This can lead to delays in service delivery and frustrated clients who have waited longer than expected for their intake forms to be processed. It can also result in creating multiple copies of an intake form, increasing the chances of input errors or confusion about who the client is and what services they are requesting. Repeat Appointments To Get It Right If there are errors on the paper intake form, the client must come back in and fill out a new one. This leads to repeat appointments and duplicate or conflicting data being entered into the system. It also puts a strain on service providers who have to take time away from their other duties. Not only does this lead to frustration for both the client and the service provider, but it can also be a waste of resources. Environmental Concerns According to data analyzed by St. Charles County (Missouri), Americans use 85 million tons of paper every year. Of those 85 million tons, approximately one billion trees worth of paper are thrown away annually. Imagine the environmental impact of having to print out thousands of intake forms every month for clients. This not only increases paper consumption and waste but also contributes to global warming, increases deforestation, and puts an additional strain on natural resources.
by Casebook Editorial Team 11 min read

Leverage Technology To Reduce Record Keeping Errors

In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significan...
In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness. In human services case management, accuracy in record keeping can define success or failure. Unfortunately, common errors like incorrect documents and inconsistent data entries can hamper the path to efficient, accurate records. The cumulative effects of these seemingly small missteps can significantly impact service delivery, compliance, and, most crucially, client outcomes. Harnessing the power of technology through human services case management software can transform this landscape. By automating tasks, standardizing data, and enabling real-time monitoring and reporting, human services management technology offers a concrete solution to prevent record keeping errors. The Importance of Maintaining Accurate and Comprehensive Client Records in Social and Human Services In social and human services, your role as a case worker or case manager often involves high caseloads and juggling many tasks at once. Maintaining accurate and comprehensive client records is imperative because the quality of your records directly affects the quality of service you can deliver to your clients. Client records are the backbone of your organization's operations. They hold a treasure trove of information that can significantly influence the trajectory of a case. From demographic details and health information to service history and progress notes, each piece of data weaves together the narrative of an individual's journey through your services. They represent the milestones each case has achieved, the challenges they've faced, and the goals they have yet to accomplish. A reliable, comprehensive client history is necessary to make informed decisions about the client's needs and craft a personalized and effective case plan. Thorough and accurate records lead to tailored services that respond directly to each client's unique needs. Moreover, these records are not just crucial to case workers — they also impact various stakeholders, including funding bodies and regulatory authorities, which may require access to these records to evaluate performance, measure outcomes, and ensure compliance with standards and regulations. A clear and complete record of your case management efforts substantiates your work and illustrates your commitment to best practices in human services. Accurate client records can also play a pivotal role in facilitating seamless transitions between different service providers. As individuals move through the system, their records follow them, providing new teams with the context they need to deliver effective support. This consistency is crucial for ensuring continuity of care. However, it's indisputable that maintaining accurate and comprehensive records is important, achieving that standard can be fraught with challenges. Human error, time constraints, and system incompatibilities often contribute to record-keeping errors, hindering your ability to provide the best possible services. Common Errors in Case Management Records Managing case records can be daunting, especially given the diversity and complexity of the data you handle. Despite your best efforts, it's not uncommon for errors to creep into your records. Here are some of the most common errors in case management records: Incomplete Data: The reasons for having incomplete data can vary: maybe the case worker was in a rush, or perhaps they didn't have all the required information at hand. In some instances, the case worker might overlook the importance of a particular data point. Whatever the reason, incomplete data can lead to gaps in understanding about a client's situation, impacting the effectiveness of the support you can provide. Misinterpretation of Information: Given the nature of the data, information can sometimes be misunderstood or misinterpreted. These can include misreading diagnostic codes, misunderstanding notes from other service providers, or simple human error due to fatigue or stress. Incorrect Data Entry: A single mistyped number or a misspelled word can significantly alter the meaning of a record and lead to incorrect conclusions about a case. Duplication: Duplication of records often happens when there is a lack of communication between different service providers or departments within the same organization. Duplicate entries create confusion and inflate the data, making analysis more difficult. Outdated Information: Client circumstances can change rapidly, and outdated information can lead to ineffective or even harmful decisions. If you don't update records promptly, it can result in decisions based on old, irrelevant information. Inconsistent Documentation: With multiple individuals involved in case management, inconsistencies in record keeping are common. Variations in terminology, differences in data recording procedure, or disparities in the level of detail case workers provide can all lead to inconsistent documentation. Each of these errors, while seemingly small, can significantly impact the quality of your case management. Incorrect or incomplete data can lead to misguided decisions, missed intervention opportunities, and decreased service effectiveness.
by Casebook Editorial Team 15 min read

10 Key Questions to Ask Yourself When Evaluating Nonprofit Client Management Systems

From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the s...
From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by.
by Casebook Editorial Team 18 min read

Reporting Impact and Communicating to Grant Funders

The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with ...
The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting. The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits. In this post, we’ll delve into reporting as well as the need for positive and open lines of communication with funders. Nonprofits, as public charities, are subject to investment from both public and private sources. Institutions (such as foundations and corporations) are examples of private sources of support necessary to nonprofits sustainable funding.Let’s say your organization has done a large amount of the work, and you just received your grant award! Beyond implementing the program, communicating with funders is key to ensuring you maintain good standing with their organization. Much of institutional giving is based on the promises you are making to these sources (your proposed programming/services, deliverables, etc.) however, equally important, is how you communicate with founders on your progress. There are the two main types of open communication with funders: formal reporting and relationship-building moments. Formal Reporting are updates given through either Interim Reporting or Impact Reports. They are often requested by each funder and have guidelines on what they should entail (typically sent in the same packet with the award letter/agreement). Interim Reports are updates that support the promised deliverables made to funders (how you’d use the funds). Even for general operating grants, updates to funders—or interim reports—are a necessary part of stewardship (aka maintaining positive relationships with funders which furthers ensure they continue to give/renew). Funding/Impact Reports are distributed to funders at the close of the grant period (typically 1-2 years, however, longer grant periods exist). They are a report back to funders on the full scope of work you’ve accomplished with their funding and a direct assessment of deliverables and key outcomes that were promised. Both of these reporting styles should have qualitative and quantitative examples that compare the progress you’re making to the deliverables you stated you would achieve. Things to detail in the more formal report include indicators of learnings, ways you improved the program, successes, and even challenges that explain where deficits occurred, and solutions you created to offset the barriers to success/implementation. This communication method leans more data driven, leveraging the quantitative efforts of your organization against the key outputs you stated that you would achieve within the initial proposal. Relationship-Building Moments are more informal updates within the stewardship process. This can take place in the form of phone calls to funders, emails, newsletter shares, and sometimes invitations to visit your program (when applicable/safe). One thing I must stress is that you can’t steward an ‘institution.’ You can only really form a bond and reputation with an individual (or group of individuals) at the foundation/corporation. These individuals, through updates, and phone calls, and ‘face- time’ begin to transition from funders to champions of your work. By communicating small victories throughout your grant period, you are showing an institution’s representative that your organization was a worthy investment, and that your impact is rippling beyond their initial grant distribution. This allows a program officer/funder to get to know you (and the organization you represent). Through your touchpoints they learn what your organization stands for at it’s core, beyond the outputs and outcomes outlined in the formal grant and impact reporting.
by Sade Dozan 11 min read

Casebook's Dynamic Pages Now Extend to the Person Profile

Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization fea...
Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs. Casebook is a powerful tool that offers organizations the ability to customize and tailor their data management system to suit their specific needs. We understand that organizations using Casebook often have unique requirements, and that's why we've been working hard to deliver the customization features you’ve been asking for. One such common request from our users is the ability to edit, hide, or remove unused fields within the platform. In the past, Casebook only allowed this level of customization on Case records, which could be configured via the Admin → Engage → Dynamic pages feature. Today, we are excited to share some fantastic news with you: we have listened to your requests and extended the full functionality of Dynamic pages to the Person profile! Expanding Dynamic Pages to the Person Profile The ability to tailor the Person profile to meet your organization's specific needs is crucial for efficient and effective data management. That's why we have now made it possible for Administrators to access Dynamic pages under Admin → People → Dynamic pages. This exciting update allows you to customize various sections of the Person profile, including Identity, Contact, Health and Medical, Education, and Employment and Finances. Customization Options With this latest update, Administrators can now: Rename sections, fields, and field groups: This feature enables you to customize the Person profile to better align with your organization's terminology and workflow, making it easier for your team to navigate and use. Archive (and unarchive) fields: If you have fields that are not required by the Casebook platform, you can now archive them to keep your Person profile clean and focused on the information that matters most. Archived fields can also be easily un-archived if needed. Apply Dynamic page settings to all new and existing people: This new functionality ensures that any customization you make to the Person profile will be applied consistently across all new and existing profiles and in all "Add person" forms throughout Access, Intake, Engage, and Track. Introducing Custom Fields We understand that different organizations have unique information tracking requirements. To further enhance the customization capabilities of the Person profile, Administrators can now add custom fields at the bottom of each section. These custom fields offer additional flexibility to track important information that your organization needs to document. Moreover, custom fields can be made required or optional to suit your specific documentation and reporting needs.
by Ben Belanger - Senior Product Manager 8 min read

From Reentry to Stability: Preventing Recidivism

People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports ...
People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration. People released from all types of detention facilities may not be fully prepared to re-enter society. They will transition from a life in which they had few choices to one in which they will have much greater control over their decisions. Many public resources bar ex-offenders, taking away supports that could help establish a crime-free life. The returnees find themselves at a crossroads; they can repeat the poor choices that led them to incarceration or make better ones and correct their life direction. Case managers coordinate with other service providers for their expertise and resources so that the client has a framework for making better decisions. , As discussed in a previous post, “Reduce Recidivism with the Right Assessment Tools”, case managers must meet with individuals who seek help or for whom you received a referral and screen them for eligibility. After a thorough screening, it’s time to move onto the next phase and develop the case management plan. Ideally, a single case plan is developed with input from all agencies interacting with the client - including the corrections, probation, and community-based providers - and the case plan follows the client into the community upon release. The corrections facility staff can provide insights on that to supplement your own assessment. In-Reach There is not a hard line between eligibility screening and initiating the services that meet each client’s constellation of needs. You can use the time you spend with them for screening to begin building trust. Many may not know what to expect when they return to society, particularly if they have been incarcerated for years. All of the networks from their life before incarceration may be broken. They might have lost family connections. Employment, housing, and public benefits are gone. Terms of release are likely to restrict contact with family and friends if they also have criminal histories. Assessment can flow into informal discussions with clients about their need to rebuild and what they have available to them. Defining those needs is the starting point for identifying the right post-release assistance and to create the structure for the service plan you will coordinate. Basic information about the client goes into the initial Casebook file. You can build on that with notes from your interviews. If you have set up a directory of providers within the program, you can enter them into the file as a workflow for the interventions you anticipate. Casebook provides organizations with the flexibility to configure it to suit their needs. Users can establish appropriate values for tracking legal factors for reentry. If the client has been sentenced to a period of probation or parole, you can maintain information about the requirements and the client’s compliance. This includes the assigned officer, when the client must report, and any other key information about terms and conditions of supervision. You can be a partner to the community probation or parole supervisor to support the client in making good choices and avoiding new offenses or technical violations that could return them to incarceration.
by Maryellen Hess Cameron 10 min read

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