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Resolving Conflicts With Tech: 10 Strategies in Child Support Case Management

As a child support case manager, you play a pivotal role in ensuring children receive the support they need. However, managing child support cases can be complex, with many parties involved and the potential for conflicts. Fortunately, technology offers innovative...
by Casebook Editorial Team 15 min read

Using Data for Enhanced Nonprofit Performance: Insights and Strategies

Whitepaper, Driving Nonprofit Impact With Data and Technology, synthesizes the findings from a survey Executive Directors of 27 agencies in human services.Survey Insights Data Utilization The survey illuminates a crucial gap, with 73% of agencies underutilizing data in...
by Casebook Editorial Team 7 min read

AI Tools for Human Services Nonprofits

Following are some AI tools for you to consider. There are many others available as well. These solutions will take some of the heavy lift off staff so your organization, and those you serve, can thrive! AI Solutions - Administrative With these tools, you can easily...
by Casebook Editorial Team 13 min read

Buy or Build Your Own Case Management System for Human Services?

You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making...
by Andrew Pelletier 20 min read

Best Practices

The Ultimate Guide to Grant Funding Success

UPDATED for 2024: Discover best practices to securing grant funding with our comprehensive guide. From identifying opportunities to crafting winning proposals, we cover everything you need to succeed.

Download now and start your journey towards grant funding success.

Secure Your Funding Pt. 3 — Emphasis On The Data

So far, we’ve reviewed watchdog sites’ standards, detailing indicators for a nonprofit’s success, and articulating metrics. What do all of these have in common? DATA! Ratings, program development, case-making…all are driven by a drumbeat of qualitative and quantitative data. How the public v...

Reporting Impact and Communicating to Grant Funders

The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

Capacity-Building Grants | Nonprofit Case Studies

In the previous post, we touched on how capacity-building grants are identified and developed in an effort to better position organizations for growth. Now, we’ll review the power of capacity-building g...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

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10 Key Questions to Ask Yourself When Evaluating Nonprofit Client Management Systems

From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the s...
From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by. From time to time, nonprofits with human and social service missions need to upgrade or completely overhaul their client management systems, also commonly known as a case management system or nonprofit database management system. Due diligence and careful evaluation are prerequisites to ensure the selected system is appropriate for the case management needs of the organization and gives significant ROI. For effective and meaningful system evaluation, the user organization needs to know the features and specifications to focus on. Using a software expert's services to help choose your nonprofit management software is a viable option. However, if an organization opts not to hire one, the ten essential questions they should ask are discussed below What's the User Friendliness Score? When evaluating the suitability of client management software, it is vital to remember that the end users are mostly not software experts. Therefore, ensuring that the end user interface is simple and user-friendly would be imperative. Difficult-to-use software can lead to users' frustration and, consequently, cause delays in task accomplishment. Remember, the ease of working with software is crucial to how well your team performs its tasks. That underlines the impact of software user comfort is critical for achieving your organization's goals and objectives. How Secure is the System? Cybersecurity is a priority for any safety-conscious software user. Software security is a crucial consideration that must not be overlooked, mainly due to the increased risk of cyberattacks on nonprofits. The heightened cyberattacks have been partly exacerbated by using client management systems with weak or non-existent security features. A 2018 State of Nonprofit Cybersecurity Report revealed that only a paltry 20.5% of nonprofit organizations had put in place policies and procedures that can be actioned in case of a cyberattack. A proactive way to address cybersecurity issues is to adopt an internal policy that requires a thorough examination of CRM or ERP software security before and after acquisition. Good software must guarantee user privacy, data security, and access control by ensuring only authorized users can securely log in and handle confidential and sensitive information. Is the Software Accessible from Multiple Locations? There is a raging debate on the question of on-premise vs. cloud-based software. On-premise software is rigid in that they're only accessible from an organization's servers or computers. On the other hand, cloud-based software is flexible regarding accessibility, allowing users to log on remotely without necessarily being within the organization's premises. All they need is access to the internet and user credentials. In this era of remote work, cloud-based client management software is preferable, especially for nonprofits with fieldwork officers who need to access the systems from the field. Remote access to the system ensures continuity of work whether the staff is in or outside their workstations. What's the cost-benefit Score? Like any other investment, software acquisition and maintenance costs must not outweigh the software's potential benefits. Nonprofit organizations may have varying needs, which may necessitate adopting different types of software at varying costs. Whether it's about settling for the right human services software, social work management system, or client management software, the organization must ensure the benefits vs. cost trade-off favors the set goals and objectives. What's the Software Ease of Configuration? As the organization's strategic goals evolve, it might need to continuously adjust the set-up features and settings of the software to align its functionality to the organization's needs. Some modern software comes with great configuration features, such as automatic data updates that simplify data-related configurations. Configuration is a relatively straightforward process compared to customization because it doesn't require changes to the core application. It only involves changing the software set-up to make the software more suitable for the organization's needs without writing new code. Is it customizable or configurable? There is much to consider on this topic, so we recommend reading more about how and why organizations are choosing configurable software vs. customizable solutions. Does the Software Offer In-Built Data Backup? In the course of operations, nonprofits gather a lot of data that is stored in internal or cloud-based servers. One of the worst experiences in tech is losing valuable data, more so in large volumes. Some software solutions, especially cloud-based ones, come with in-built backup features that form part of their service offering and are worth considering. Does the Vendor Have Comprehensible User Manuals? Some client management software may be complex even in the long run. That necessitates clear, easy-to-read user manuals to help users navigate challenges that may arise while handling the software. Are there Adequate Features for User Level Rights Control? The ability to control user rights to access information in the software is crucial to reducing the risk of unauthorized user access. The software should also guarantee adequate permissions to enable users to perform their tasks effectively. How are the Vendor's Reputation and Rating? A vendor's reliability and service level rating are crucial because it determines the overall customer experience you expect from them. It's recommended to check their reputation and rating in the industry as that is the fool-proof way to determine their competence and legitimacy to handle your software needs competently. A highly rated and reputable vendor is recommendable because they guarantee better services if other people's experience is something to go by.
by Casebook Editorial Team 18 min read

Maximizing Your Impact: How Nonprofit Software Can Streamline Operations for Human Services Organizations

Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is ...
Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders. Nonprofit organizations providing human services face a multitude of challenges when managing their operations. From tracking clients and their needs to reporting on program outcomes, these organizations must effectively manage a vast amount of information to fulfill their mission. The good news is that nonprofit software can solve these challenges by simplifying operations and automating many time-consuming tasks. One type of nonprofit management software that can be helpful for human services organizations is case management systems. The Challenges of Human Services Operations Human services organizations work with many clients with diverse needs and require different services. Managing this information manually can make it difficult for organizations to effectively fulfill their mission and serve their clients. Here are some common challenges: Client intake: One of the biggest challenges for human services organizations is effectively managing client intake. Collecting client information and assessing needs can be time-consuming and complex, and organizations may struggle to keep track of this information. Client tracking: Organizations must track the progress and outcomes once clients have been admitted to a program. It includes monitoring services provided, measuring progress toward goals, and recording client status changes. Reporting: Human services organizations are required to provide regular reports to funders and other stakeholders. This process can be time-consuming and may involve collecting and analyzing a large amount of data. Paper-based systems: Many organizations still rely on paper-based systems for managing client information, which can be prone to errors and difficult to organize. These challenges can significantly impact an organization's ability to fulfill its mission and serve its clients optimally. For example, if intake and tracking processes are inefficient, clients may not receive timely and appropriate services. In addition, if reporting is inaccurate or incomplete, organizations may have difficulty securing funding or demonstrating the impact of their programs. Streamlining operations through nonprofit software solutions can enable human services organizations to overcome these challenges and focus more on serving their clients. The Benefits of Case Management Software for Nonprofit nonprofit case management software is a specialized category of software. These software solutions offer a range of features and benefits that can help human services organizations to manage their operations better. One of the key benefits of nonprofit case management software is it can help organizations simplify their operations and automate many time-consuming tasks. For example, a case management system like Casebook can help human services organizations manage client data more effectively by providing intake, tracking, and reporting tools. These tools can help organizations improve client outcomes by ensuring they offer services that meet each individual's specific needs. In addition to streamlining operations, Casebook can help organizations track client progress and outcomes, which is crucial for demonstrating program impact to funders and other stakeholders.
by Casebook Editorial Team 9 min read

The Power of SMARTIE Deliverables

So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through th...
So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en So, how do we build trust? You build trust by ensuring that you’re following through on your commitments and promises to funders. This is partly why the engagement phase is so important, each follow-up, touch point engagement moment underline commitments and builds trust. As you’re moving through the initial cultivation process or renewal phase, funders will often be interested in your current accomplishments and what you intend to do if awarded funding. This is where deliverables come in as central to communicating and building to trust with donors. Simply put, deliverables are goods or services produced as a result of a project that is intended to be delivered. These goals need to be concrete but they almost must be within the organizations field of interest and realistic to their giving patterns. Field of Interest is what it sounds like! —the scopes of work funders are interested in funding, usually defined in categories like Health Care, Technology Innovation, Youth, Families, etc. Sometimes these fields of interest have sub-categories and fancy titles such as Equity in Hospitals or Future of Work(ers). However, an institution’s giving pattern shows how large, frequent, and the scale of the investment funders make within those sections. A funder can distribute funds across multiple fields of interest, but how deeply (such as 85% of their giving going towards Healthy Children & Family v. Research) and how much (1M average grants v. 10K) is the structure of their giving pattern. Keep this in mind as you think about your engagement and trust-building with funder—the field of interest and potential giving request should all be aligned with the scope of work you’re proposing. Best practices teach us that deliverables need to follow a specific format —SMARTIE—to articulate that they are equitable, tangible, and actionable actions. SMARTIE goals often resonate best with program officers as you work to convey your organization’s trustworthiness. When creating outcomes for your work, use the below prompts to determine if the deliverable is a SMARTIE goal? Strategic - Is the deliverable consistent with our priorities? Measurable - Can you quantitatively or qualitatively measure it? Ambitious - Does the deliverable meaningfully progress our work? Realistic - Can the deliverable be achieved with a set amount of resources and time? Time-bound - Is it tied to a specific date/time? Inclusive - Does the deliverable afford power to those who are marginalized? Equitable - Does the deliverable address systemic injustice? Of special note, it is easier to write a grant proposal when you have deliverables to frame it around. Having clear deliverables ahead of moving into the cultivation phase also makes it easier to answer funders’ questions during meetings. Deliverables are a roadmap for not just the funder but also for you. When executive leadership, development teams and program staff are co-developing deliverables it helps improve collaboration and productivity. Key to the success of grant programs and deliverables development is maintaining a solid database. Because you’re reading this, your organization is likely at a stage where it has (or desires to have) multiple on-going grants and cultivation opportunities. Customer relationship management (CRM) tools are also key to keeping track of all the touch points needed to stay the course on the pathway to funding success. CRMs are cloud-based platforms that support data management. Without an effective platform, it can be difficult to remember which deliverables are for which projects -- as well as when they are due. Effectively tracking en
by Sade Dozan 12 min read

What's the Right Software for Your Human Services Organization?

In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to r...
In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best? In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and the great resignation, businesses across many industries have experienced an uptick in employee turnover. This trend has been especially prominent in the nonprofit sector, where limited budgets and resources often make it difficult for organizations to retain their top talent. As it has for every kind of enterprise, software for human services organizations has developed prodigiously in a few short years. Volunteers and workers who confront disease and deprivation on a daily basis, however, are still ill-equipped to defeat these enemies which drive their efforts and guide their missions. As you consider the range of options available to suit your organization's purposes, there are some fundamental questions that should be answered. Features can vary dramatically, offering divergent functionalities and many degrees of user-friendliness. Read on for a better sense of the software choices available to support your organization. 4 Key Advantages of Software for Human Services Organizations The technologies in common use by human services organizations have consistently been decades behind those in other fields. Widespread adoption of software applications for essential processes has been a long time coming, putting the most vulnerable people in society at greater and greater risk. Providers increasingly need real-time access to data regarding their clients as well as internal matters, and so software solutions are constantly updated to meet the evolving needs of human services organizations. Besides the gains in efficiency that the right software brings to your organization, other advantages include: Cleaner, more reliable data resulting from fewer manual processes and reduced likelihood of human error Analytics to provide actionable insights on your clients, staff, funding sources, and more Less paper and material infrastructure to maintain, creating less cumbersome and more sustainable processes Improved user experiences for everyone involved — your staff, administration, and your clients The increased visibility into your internal resources made possible by software also leads to fewer interruptions for your staff in the event of shift schedule changes and work absences. However, considerable contrast exists in the available types of software for human services organizations. Before wading into individual software options, your organization will want to come to a decision on a fundamental question: would an on-premise or cloud-based solution serve you best?
by Brian Johnson 8 min read

Building Solutions for Today and for Tomorrow

A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn ...
A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade. A new decade is starting, which is a good time for us all to reflect on the world we had a decade ago and the world we will have a decade from now. The iPad, streaming services like Netflix, on-demand services like Uber, drones, and AIs like Siri and Alexa, all things that did not exist at the dawn of the last decade, but are now deeply embedded into our culture. In such a dynamic environment, I am often asked how we build for the future. Casebook tends to stay on top of the significant trends and deliver software that seems either the right thing at the right time or feels ahead of the rest of the world. To do so, we had to think through every facet of our business, and configure an organization that ensures our customers are always on the cutting edge of progress in human services. So today I’d like to say a few words about our technology, something we don’t always bring front and center when we talk to customers. Because the pace of technology accelerates with every passing decade, building for flexibility is key to building long term solutions. With as broad a mission as helping the front-line protect the most vulnerable members of society through software, we have been forced to think through that flexibility. Internally, this has taken the shape of a microservices architectures based on Kubernetes and exposed to the outside world through open APIs using a modern design system. Kubernetes is a container technology that allows us to build software that is self-healing and self-growing: what this means is that we ensure high levels of redundancy across every aspect of our security and quality management so that customers can safely run their operations without having to worry about the impact of new deployments or external hackers. Our systems stay up 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, no matter what. Thanks to this, we’ve had military experts test our security and fail at achieving any critical impact. Microservices are the type of software architecture the new world is built on. By breaking applications down to simple, highly maintainable and testable services, this type of architecture is giving us the greatest flexibility to adapt to any future technology requirements. This approach, which is the one taken by the likes of Netflix, Amazon, Uber, and many others, represents a considerable change to the way software is built and allows us to develop at a much faster pace without interrupting the existing functionality of applications while they are running. Because each discreet service is right-sized, it can be distributed across a variety of platforms, whether it is through a web browser, mobile device, audio channel, or bot service. I suspect that the next decade will bring new forms of interactions in human services through augmented reality and virtual reality, and our software will be there with you when those new distribution channels achieve greater maturity. In today’s world, thinking through modern applications also means thinking through the interaction users have with the applications. But as you know, the interaction you have with a mobile device is different from the interaction you have with a computer or tablet. We call each of those channels. To ensure the best experience across all channels and drive consistency across business apps and channels, we have created a Design System, ensuring a consistent user experience on all of our applications. Companies like Apple, Google, and Microsoft follow this model to ensure consistency across different channels. The Casebook Design System allows for our applications to evolve and incorporate the latest design trends into our offerings, ensuring that you will always get the best experience with our software. We live in an increasingly connected world and software like ours doesn’t operate in a bubble, and as such we have a set of open APIs, which can be used to lower the disruption and cost of integration. We’ve made connecting Casebook apps with your other systems seamless. These open APIs allow software developers to create added solutions on top of our systems. We expect to make more announcements around this in the future, as our offerings grow, and third parties start offering new apps that leverage these APIs. We’ve focused on ensuring that our technology does not stand in the way of your future. We are looking forward to future collaborations in this new decade.
by Joshua Cruz 15 min read

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