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Resolving Conflicts With Tech: 10 Strategies in Child Support Case Management

As a child support case manager, you play a pivotal role in ensuring children receive the support they need. However, managing child support cases can be complex, with many parties involved and the potential for conflicts. Fortunately, technology offers innovative...
by Casebook Editorial Team 15 min read
by Casebook Editorial Team 11 min read

What Is Intensive Case Management?

by Maryellen Hess Cameron 15 min read

How Can Workflows Support Home Visits?

Using Data for Enhanced Nonprofit Performance: Insights and Strategies

Whitepaper, Driving Nonprofit Impact With Data and Technology, synthesizes the findings from a survey Executive Directors of 27 agencies in human services.Survey Insights Data Utilization The survey illuminates a crucial gap, with 73% of agencies underutilizing data in...
by Casebook Editorial Team 7 min read

AI Tools for Human Services Nonprofits

Following are some AI tools for you to consider. There are many others available as well. These solutions will take some of the heavy lift off staff so your organization, and those you serve, can thrive! AI Solutions - Administrative With these tools, you can easily...
by Casebook Editorial Team 13 min read

Buy or Build Your Own Case Management System for Human Services?

You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making...
by Andrew Pelletier 20 min read

Best Practices

The Ultimate Guide to Grant Funding Success

UPDATED for 2024: Discover best practices to securing grant funding with our comprehensive guide. From identifying opportunities to crafting winning proposals, we cover everything you need to succeed.

Download now and start your journey towards grant funding success.

Secure Your Funding Pt. 3 — Emphasis On The Data

So far, we’ve reviewed watchdog sites’ standards, detailing indicators for a nonprofit’s success, and articulating metrics. What do all of these have in common? DATA! Ratings, program development, case-making…all are driven by a drumbeat of qualitative and quantitative data. How the public v...

Reporting Impact and Communicating to Grant Funders

The previous post outlined the primary types of capacity-building projects and reviewed how transformational successful capacity-building implementation have been, for example, nonprofits...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

Capacity-Building Grants | Nonprofit Case Studies

In the previous post, we touched on how capacity-building grants are identified and developed in an effort to better position organizations for growth. Now, we’ll review the power of capacity-building g...

by Sade Dozan4 min read

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Latest Blogs

Discharge Planning Checklist for Case Managers

As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importa...
As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights. As a case manager, you play a critical role in ensuring effective discharge planning for your clients. With the increasing focus on care coordination and care transitions, a comprehensive discharge planning checklist for case managers is essential to facilitate timely and safe discharge. The Importance of Discharge Planning in Healthcare Effective discharge planning is crucial for positive patient outcomes. Quality discharge planning improves continuity of care by addressing the patient's needs even after leaving the facility. It provides a smooth transition that is safe and tailored to the patient's medical conditions, daily living abilities, support systems, and preferences. Thorough discharge planning also enhances patient satisfaction and reduces preventable readmissions related to premature discharges or lack of follow-up care. High turnover can have serious consequences for nonprofits, including reduced productivity, decreased morale, and increased costs — all of which directly affect the quality of services these organizations provide to their constituents. In this article, we'll discuss why high turnover is a critical issue for nonprofit organizations, the negative impacts of high turnover on nonprofit organizations and the people they serve, the best practices for keeping teams engaged and reducing turnover, and how low-cost nonprofit case management software can help improve engagement and retention in nonprofit teams. The Role of Case Managers in Ensuring Smooth Transitions Case managers spearhead effective discharge planning tailored to each patient’s situation. You typically initiate the discharge planning early during a patient’s hospital stay. Initial and ongoing assessments identify the physical, mental, emotional, functional, and social factors that impact the transition plan. The key responsibilities of case managers in discharge planning include: Determining the appropriate discharge disposition based on factors like living situation, mobility, cognitive status, caregiver resources, medical necessity, and insurance coverage. It helps guide whether patients can go home with services or require facility care. Collaborating across the care team, including doctors, nurses, rehab therapists, and utilization reviewers. Case managers help develop an integrated plan of care addressing clinical, equipment, home care, and other needs. Coordinating details like durable medical equipment deliveries, infusion therapy, home modifications for safety, transportation to appointments, insurance authorizations, and medication access. Educating patients, family members, and informal caregivers about medical conditions, follow-up needs, medications, and warning signs and creating a teach-back process. Arranging post-discharge services like home health, rehab, and nutrition support and coordinating these across multiple payers and health care providers. Screening for mental health needs and risks such as depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and cognitive decline, and arranging counseling, peer support, or other services. Identifying community resources to address social determinants of health related to finances, food access, housing, transportation, caregiver support, or other needs. Communicating relevant information to receiving providers regarding new diagnoses, changes to medications and functional status, follow-up needs, and other updates to promote continuity of care. As you coordinate the intricate details of discharge planning, an organized checklist helps standardize this complex process to reduce errors and oversights.
by Dipesh Dhital 10 min read

Can You Define Homelessness? The Four Types of Homelessness

Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and U...
Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here. Is your client homeless? How do you define homelessness? In human services It’s not a simple yes or no answer. Instead it’s multiple choice. There are four categories of homelessness used for federal housing programs. Then it gets complicated, but we’ll break it down. The Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) provides the bulk of financial support for housing programs. Some HUD programs are dedicated for one category of homelessness only. Others are for multiple categories of homelessness. Some programs can differ at the state or local level. It’s a great big puzzle. (After you look at the puzzle pieces you might be inclined to call it something more colorful.) This article can explain the four types of homelessness that are set by HUD. Other federal agencies and many states use these definitions as well This article reviews some of the available resources for people who fit one or more of the definitions. By the end of this article you will understand the terms you will hear when you investigate housing programs. It introduces you to resources to investigate to stabilize your client’s housing. Category 1: Literal Homelessness Category 1 defines homelessness as people who are literally homeless. HUD’s verbatim explanation for a household follows: Individual or family who lacks a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence, meaning: Has a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not meant for human habitation; or Is living in a publicly or privately operated shelter designated to provide temporary living arrangements (including congregate shelters, transitional housing, and hotels and motels paid for by charitable organizations or by federal, state and local government programs); or Is exiting an institution where (s)he has resided for 90 days or less and who resided in an emergency shelter or place not meant for human habitation immediately before entering that institution. Public or private spaces captures locations such as tents, cars, or abandoned buildings. In my years as a director of an agency serving homeless people we saw people get creative. One gentleman liked to sleep in our front garden; another slept under our large, outdoor utility box. (It gave them one advantage: they could enter our drop in center the minute we opened our doors.) If your client has been in an institution such as jail, hospital, or intermediate care facility for less than 90 days, and goes there from the street or shelter they retain their homeless status. In other words, there has been no break in homelessness. If they went to a temporary, but legitimate housing situation (consider a family member’s home who took them in until they healed) they lose their homeless status. You should also understand the term chronic homeless status. This definition is the most restrictive. Households must: Have a documented disability, and They have been homeless continuously for one year, or have had at least episodes in the last four years that add up to 12 months. When you are aware that your client is literally homeless, record each homeless episode in your case management software. If you document a single incident in a month HUD counts it for the entire month. There’s one more term on Category 1 to keep in mind if you are trying to document chronic status that adds up to 12 months. A “break” in homelessness is considered to be seven or more nights. For example, John has been in an emergency shelter for 30 days. He slept on a friend’s couch for six nights and then returned to the shelter for 30 days. He’s been homeless for 67 days continuously. Suppose John spent 30 days in a shelter, slept on a friend’s couch for eight nights and returned to the shelter for 30 days. He had two incidents of homelessness that add up to 60 days. See HUD’s flow chart to document chronic homelessness here.
by Maryellen Hess Cameron 13 min read

What Is Targeted Case Management?

Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, an...
Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes. Targeted case management is an essential human services practice focused on providing individualized support and care coordination to clients with complex needs. As a case manager, you take on a critical role in helping high-risk individuals access necessary services, progress toward their goals, and lead healthier, more stable lives. What Is the Purpose of Targeted Case Management? Targeted case management emerged as a best practice for working with individuals struggling with multiple, interconnected issues. While general case management provides basic care coordination services, targeted case management offers more individualized support. The main purpose is to identify clients at greatest risk for poor outcomes and provide tailored services to address their complex needs. It prevents them from falling through the cracks in the human services system and not receiving adequate care. Federal requirements have set criteria to identify and serve eligible individuals for targeted services, ensuring that resources go where they're most needed. Some examples of individuals who may benefit from targeted case management include: Those with chronic mental illnesses or substance use disorders Individuals recently released from prison Individuals and families experiencing homelessness Elderly patients with health concerns Children and youth in foster care Without intensive, wraparound services, these vulnerable clients are more likely to cycle in and out of jails, hospitals, and treatment programs. Targeted case management aims to provide stability, improve quality of life, and reduce recidivism. Targeted Case Management vs. General Case Management So, what sets targeted case management apart from general case management approaches? There are a few key differences: Intensity of services: Targeted case management involves frequent face-to-face contact, sometimes weekly or daily check-ins, depending on client needs. General case management may only require a few set periodic meetings with clients. Comprehensiveness: Targeted case managers coordinate care across various life domains like healthcare, housing, legal issues, finances, and employment. General case management may focus on just one or two service areas. Duration: Targeted case management provides long-term support and monitoring, sometimes for years, depending on the client. General case management typically involves short-term connections. The Role of Targeted Case Managers in Providing Tailored Support Targeted case manager duties include getting to know clients deeply as individuals so that you can create tailored plans that meet their unique needs and goals. You'll work one-on-one with clients over an extended period to: Conduct comprehensive assessments covering their health histories, trauma backgrounds, family dynamics, education levels, and more. It helps you understand the full picture. Identify priority areas for intervention based on their strengths, challenges, and aspirations. Develop highly individualized case plans outlining specific services, support, and timelines. Directly provide services like crisis counseling, skills training, or family mediation. Coordinate and monitor various services by community providers. Build trusting relationships that motivate and encourage clients through obstacles. Celebrate incremental progress and successes. You'll customize the full suite of services around each client's values, culture, responsibilities, and vision for the future. No two targeted case management plans look exactly alike. By getting to know clients intimately, you can walk alongside them, advocate for their needs, and help them navigate complex systems. Your partnership, empathy, and case management skills are key to targeted case management outcomes.
by Dipesh Dhital 11 min read

A Guide To Case Management Models

As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The type...
As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually. As a case manager, you'll encounter clients and cases requiring particular approaches to guarantee quality care. While every case and treatment plan is different, most types of case management models fall into four categories. The Importance of Choosing the Right Model for Your Organization The types of case management models differ in their implementation, goals, practices, and workload. Each model suits clients in unique ways, so it's essential to understand each model's capabilities and limitations before implementing your plan of care. Many social work teams utilize specific models, such as clinical case management for medical facilities, whereas other social workers determine their approach based on each client's needs. In some situations, you can integrate different processes for more dynamic case management. For instance, a care provider using an intensive case management model may integrate strengths-based practices for better results. Key Case Management Models and Their Applications Though different treatment plans may adopt unique or hybrid approaches, there are generally four types of case management models to be aware of. Brokerage models have the most hands-off style, and intensive and strengths-based models are significantly more personalized to the client. Brokerage Model As the name implies, brokerage case managers serve as "brokers" between clients and their available resources. Cases following the brokerage model are often the shortest because they generally only involve connecting clients with appropriate services. The difficulty of these cases usually depends on the client's particular needs and the case manager's network. Most social workers who use this model won't have to establish full treatment plans. However, they may still spend extensive time finding and setting up the right medical or community services for their clients. For example, the brokerage model is useful for many substance use cases. During intake, case managers will initially meet with clients to identify their needs and goals. From there, they'll find the appropriate supportive services, considering medical, community, and online resources. Once the service referrals are complete, the case manager supervises the ongoing support and steps in as needed. Brokerage models may also apply to the following case types: Disability or impairment Chronic illness Aging Occupational and employment assistance Housing assistance Public welfare Intensive Case Management In contrast to the brokerage model, the intensive case management model demands a more personal connection between the client and their social worker. In this model, case managers work directly with their clients to gauge the full extent of their needs and provide specialized support throughout their care plan. Intensive models are often reserved for clients with significant and ongoing needs related to, for example, chronic pain or trauma. Many cases consist of helping clients socialize more, adjust to being in public, feel safe around people, and overcome other obstacles. Some intensive cases require service referrals to occupational therapy, rehabilitation, and other direct services. Case types that may require intensive case management include: Developmental disabilities Disability or impairment Chronic illness Crisis intervention Domestic abuse PTSD or social anxiety Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Housing assistance Socialization Clinical Case Management Like the intensive case model, clinical case management offers a significantly more hands-on approach. However, rather than overseeing a client's full treatment, clinical case managers usually only provide one service in a pre-established care plan, usually within a designated facility. For example, a clinical social worker may be assigned to a hospital patient undergoing long-term treatment. In this situation, the worker would frequently check in on the patient's emotional, mental, and occupational needs. Clinical cases are often more therapeutic than intensive cases, though each care plan varies according to the client's needs. Case managers usually step into the role of therapist or counselor and recommend educational resources. However, other aspects of treatment are overseen by different health professionals, such as doctors and physical therapists, limiting case managers' capabilities. Many clinical social workers work within specific organizations, such as schools, hospitals, or correctional facilities, where they can meet directly with their clients. As these roles tend to include unique titles and responsibilities, case managers may need additional training and skills for clinical positions. For example, some high schools and colleges require teaching certificates from counselors. That said, clinical cases aren't exclusive to designated facilities. Brokerage case clients may require frequent clinical check-ins as they receive their other services, and some social workers focus solely on clinical community services. Because of this, most social workers should understand the therapeutic practices of clinical case management, regardless of what models they use. Strengths-Based Model Strength-based approaches spotlight and encourage clients to build upon their available resources and previous successes. These case models are less focused on correcting shortcomings or finding outside resources. Instead, they're about building upon the client's existing strengths, network, and practices to improve their quality of life, though applications of this model vary drastically. A basic example of a case requiring a strengths-based model is a client with social fears or anxiety. Assuming the client doesn't require intensive care for a more significant issue, a strengths-based case manager will first establish the client's needs and goals. From here, they'll work with the client one on one and encourage them to practice socializing with people in their network, such as family, friends, and people in their local community. Using a strengths-based approach, the case manager will highlight where the client is successful in social settings. They may also discuss social drawbacks, including conversations the client couldn't maintain, but the focus is primarily on moving forward. By spotlighting the client's strengths and available resources, the case manager aims to help the client grow more self-confident and independent. The strengths-based management model often applies to the following case types: Advocacy Socialization PTSD or social anxiety Developmental disabilities Aging Ongoing medical needs Substance use Policy and planning Strengths-based practices are increasingly common in effective case management models, including clinical and intensive cases. This is because many clients show better progress when focusing on their strengths rather than being reminded of their weaknesses. Factors to Consider When Implementing Case Management Models There are many variables to consider when determining which case management models to adopt. Although your client's needs and health outcomes should be your first priority, you should also be aware of potential obstacles, limitations, and better alternatives. Organizational Readiness Ensuring both you and your organization are in a place to take on a particular client or management model is crucial for continuity of care. If you realize midway through a care plan that your organization cannot fully meet the client's needs, you may have to transfer or refer them to another care provider. This could impair the client's recovery and damage your reputation. Before implementing your management model, consider the following organizational factors and limitations: Scheduling conflicts Staff availability and caseloads Commute time Resources Skills and qualifications Training and Skill Development It's crucial to recognize when the case managers within your organization lack the training and experience to provide quality care for a client. Clients with more complicated needs often require specialized care coordination from, for instance, a mental health or developmental disabilities social worker. Not having the proper qualifications doesn't always mean you have to drop or transfer the client. Instead, you can adopt brokerage or intensive case models by referring clients to specialists while covering the rest of their care plan yourself. Data Management and Tracking Using analytics and data automation can improve evidence-based case management models and let you provide a unique quality of care. Human services software, such as Casebook, features data reporting functions that automatically compile and deliver client and case information. In doing so, they let you skip multiple steps in the health case management process so you can focus on providing high-quality services. Many of these management programs also use real-time case tracking to notify you about every update. This way, you'll always know when paperwork is submitted, insurance is approved, or a task is complete. These resources let you streamline your services and achieve more in a shorter period of time. This efficiency has allowed many social workers to take on more clients or do more with their current caseloads. Organizations that use management software can take on more intensive case management models than organizations that still file their data manually.
by Trevor Norkey 28 min read

10 Key Case Management Best Practices

As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand...
As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources. As a case manager, the way you interact with clients significantly impacts their lives and reflects on your organization. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. All clients are different and procedures are ever-changing, so you should aim to evaluate and expand upon your case management practices regularly. In doing so, you can empower your clients and cultivate a stronger, mutually beneficial approach. Continue reading to learn about case management best practices you can adopt. Elevate Your Case Management by Following Essential Best Practices From social work organizations to nursing homes, case management's complex processes make it challenging to give clients the level of care they need. Utilizing resources such as industry news and human services software can help simplify these processes and return your focus to the clients. Below are 10 case management best practices that will elevate your services. 1. Cultivate a Client-Centered Approach Maintaining a client-focused continuity of care is often easier said than done, especially amid workforce and protocol changes. There's no universal method for keeping your organization focused on clients, and most shortcomings are unintentional. Because of this, cultivating a client-centered approach is a constant battle that varies by case manager, client, and environment. Below are a few strategies for maintaining a client-focused organization: Regularly survey clients and staff members. Encourage strength-based approaches. Develop plans around clients' needs. Provide resources for identifying stigmas and clients' changing needs. Use regular reminders to keep the focus on the clients. Utilize software that simplifies information for easier access. Consider when other case managers may be better suited for specific clients. Encourage more face-to-face interactions in hybrid settings. 2. Uphold Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Teamwork Thanks to their unique skills, training, and experience, every case management team member has their own specialties in approaching clients. Sharing perspectives and ideas can significantly improve your management process and help you provide better care for your clients. Additionally, as case managers work together, they'll likely gain new skills and gather new resources, which they can then use to help future clients. Encouraging teamwork and knowledge sharing can also help you identify underutilized team members, such as social workers with unique college training. If a case manager struggles with a specific client's needs, they can consult a coworker with more applicable experience. From here, they can share resources, suggest the next steps to take, or smoothly transfer the client to someone else if needed. 3. Perform Comprehensive Assessments of Client Information Providing unbiased and fully informed client assessments is a crucial aspect of social work. Unfortunately, for many case managers, avoiding misjudgments during intake and reviews is difficult amid workplace changes, administrative tasks, and shifting client needs. Many organizations now use human services software to help with the assessment process by compiling and analyzing client records. However, simply using any case management software isn't enough to ensure your assessments are comprehensive. The software you use must be dependable in its analyses, and case managers must understand what to do with the information. Each client is unique, and even the most complex algorithms can't evaluate every human's needs. Case management software such as Casebook isn't meant to create assessments for you, but rather to make clients' information more comprehensible for an easier, more focused assessment process. 4. Perform Regular Evaluations Regular evaluations help ensure your organization consistently provides high-quality services. This is especially critical amid social work changes, as new protocols, needs, and concerns could require your focus to shift. Staying up to date on industry changes is a vital aspect of case management because it helps you identify specific areas of improvement. For example, reading current studies about racial bias in the human services sector can help highlight shortcomings and opportunities during your next evaluation. Routine evaluations also benefit clients by improving the attention they receive. For instance, your organization could encourage regular client check-ins or implement more frequent case evaluations by leadership. Clients' needs can change due to countless factors, so your management model should be prepared to adapt based on your findings. 5. Maintain Accurate and Secure Records Keeping clients' information organized and secure isn't important just for legality, but it also improves your productivity. A thoroughly organized system will keep your data accessible and comprehensible. This way, whether a case manager is taking in a new client or double-checking an old client's records, they can quickly access what they need in real time. Organization can also alleviate workplace stress by removing clutter. Thus, you can improve your engagement, your mental health, and the level of care clients receive. Additionally, online case management storage lets social workers complete tasks outside of the office, creating opportunities for hybrid work. 6. Maintain Clear Communication Between Clients and Teams A clear and easily accessible line of communication goes a long way toward improving the care clients receive. A misplaced email, forgotten phone call, or outdated number can lead to missed appointments and setbacks regarding care goals. Many organizations use case management software to provide consistent communication. Most messaging systems let clients choose their preferred method of contact, such as call, email, or text, to ensure you can always reach them in the most convenient way. Additionally, by messaging through the management app, you can later review all your client communications in one place. This saves you from the hassle of using search filters in your email and text message inboxes. 7. Empower Clients and Advocate for Their Rights Client empowerment is about providing clients with a level of care that improves their quality of life. As such, the client's care goals should be primarily based on their personal aspirations and strengths. Including clients in the decision-making process will help you personalize their plan of care and help them understand their next steps. This level of empowerment can improve your clients' engagement, confidence, and independence. Including clients in the process also makes it easier to identify when their needs go unmet. In doing so, you'll be able to advocate for clients more effectively and defend their case. 8. Balance Clients' Needs and Professional Standards In human services, the line between clients' needs and what's actually possible always feels blurred. Therefore, it's essential to keep your care goals balanced and realistic based on each case. Frequent meetings about industry shifts and changing practices are a beneficial way to maintain a reliable balance. This way, you and your team stay aware of new case management models, restrictions, and focuses as they develop. By staying on top of changing procedures, such as diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives and data storage protocols, you can reduce the amount of work that has to be redone and keep the focus on the client. 9. Embrace Technological Advancements Love it or hate it, technology is now one of the core components of social work. Today, most organizations use at least some sort of software to organize their client lists, data, and communications. While adapting to specific programs is often challenging, technology can significantly improve your workflow because it's almost always improving itself. Case management software developers often release new updates and features for simplified access, organization, and usability. Staying on top of these updates and understanding your software's full capabilities can help you fully utilize it and improve your efficiency across the board. For instance, Casebook's comprehensive records system may complete administrative tasks that you didn't even realize you could skip. 10. Use Analytics to Inform Your Strategies Case management software compiles, analyzes, and cleanly presents information for you, saving you multiple steps in the case management process. This simplified information makes developing strategies and management plans easier by letting you focus entirely on the data. Analytics can significantly improve your assessments and goal-planning, but you shouldn't solely rely on them. Instead, you should consider what the analytics have to say and use that to determine the rest of your plan. Combining analytics with your own case management expertise enables you to provide a better standard of care comprising all applicable resources.
by Trevor Norkey 27 min read

7 Must-Have Case Management System Features

Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus o...
Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress. Working in the human services sector can be complicated and overwhelming, which is why many organizations use case management systems. These platforms and apps help improve case management practices by compiling information and automating responsibilities. This gives caseworkers more time to focus on their clients' needs and other business processes. When deciding on the software, you should consider key case management system features, such as communication and storage capabilities. Additionally, you should double-check its dependability to ensure lagging notifications and cybersecurity threats won't set you back. Continue reading to answer the question, "What is case management software?" and learn how its key features can help you. The Role of Case Management Systems in Streamlining Processes Platforms such as Casebook simplify and often accelerate management processes by automating tasks, facilitating communication, and providing real-time updates. Nonprofit organizations that use these key features can deliver better and faster customer service by simplifying clients' duties and letting workers focus on case details. Case management system features have now replaced many social work tasks, including: Compiling and filing case data Double-entering clients' forms Creating customized forms and paperwork Checking insurance and licensing progress Scheduling appointments and service requests Sending appointment reminders Identifying entry errors Core Functionalities for Effective Case Management Systems While every platform's abilities vary, many management tools utilize similar functionalities, such as workflow automation and messaging tools. Which key features you prioritize will depend on your organization's needs. However, there are a few capabilities that efficient and reliable management software cannot function without. Below are the seven most significant case management system features to look for. 1. Intuitive User Interface A high-quality user interface should comprehensively communicate to all parties everything they need to know, from your end to the client's. On the case manager's side, the interface should simplify their workflow, such as by listing current tasks and compiling all relevant case details. On the client's side, the platform should be digestible and easy to use so they can schedule appointments, complete documents, and add signatures without technical help. A platform or app's dashboard is usually the first page you see when opening it and should clearly display the tabs, data, and progress details for your cases. Quality case management dashboards often include: Number of active cases Current and overdue tasks "Create new task" options Case updates, such as provider approval Pending reports Pending applications Appointment calendar 2. Robust Client Data Management Managing data is arguably the most essential duty of case management systems, enabling caseworkers to access intake notes, client details, and other files with ease. Efficient data management is especially vital for hybrid work environments by allowing staff to complete more work away from their desk. Additionally, it simplifies supervision by leadership by making all applicable case details easily accessible when evaluating teams. Platforms that automate data are especially beneficial during the intake process, letting you seamlessly migrate a client's records to their current case. Plus, any digital forms or intake notes completed during the process automatically integrate within the case file for easy access later. Systems that use secure permission models make data management more efficient by limiting who has access to case files. Case administrators can assign permissions to specific caseworkers, streamlining file sharing and ensuring no one else can access clients' data. 3. Workflow Automation For many years, administrative tasks such as scheduling and double-entering forms have dominated much of business process management. Today, management solutions have simplified the amount of "busy work" thrown on social workers and other health professionals. Forms can be completed digitally and automatically added to the client's file, saving you multiple steps so you can focus solely on what matters. This workflow automation improves efficiency and peace of mind, decreasing the amount of work needed from staff. With more room in their workday, case workers may take on more cases, give their clients more attention, or take back the 15-minute breaks that were gradually replaced with paperwork. Many management tools use similar automation features, such as digital forms, calendars, and online storage, though not every platform suits every organization. Casebook's Track feature simplifies the finer steps of case management by automatically updating tasks, documents, and licensing. This way, social workers can act the moment a case is ready to move to the next step. 4. Secure Data Storage and HIPAA Compliance Securely storing and protecting clients' personal data is essential to health case management. Through the management process, clients share their family details, Social Security numbers, and other confidential information. When misused or accessed due to improper cybersecurity, this data could create financial and safety risks for clients. Additionally, mishandled data violates the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Online cloud storage is one of the most efficient ways to store and access clients' cases, but it puts them at a greater risk of cyber attacks. Additionally, with communication primarily conducted online, clients and case managers are more likely to accidentally send personal information over email or other unsecured platforms. Because of these risks, it's crucial for case management system features to include thorough cybersecurity. For instance, Casebook utilizes three-tier security that strengthens its applications, storage cloud, and permission model. These multiple layers keep clients' data dependably protected from cyber attackers and ensure you stay compliant with HIPAA, FERPA, and other confidentiality standards. 5. Real-Time Interaction and Updates These platform's most significant benefit is their ability to speed up case management processes by automating data and easing the workflow. With fewer administrative tasks, caseworkers can give clients the help they need sooner, though technical issues and lags can occur. When selecting a human services software to work with, you should choose one with real-time updates and interactions. These key features notify case managers as soon as tasks are completed, such as when clients submit forms or an insurance provider sends approval. In doing so, they enable workers to move to a case's next tasks as soon as they're ready, significantly cutting down on intake wait times. Real-time case updates are also beneficial for effective collaboration, allowing case workers to share important files with each other or with leadership as necessary. This way, you don't have to wait for a lag delay when changing file permissions, and you avoid the cybersecurity risks of sending files over email. 6. Integrated Communication Tools By combining all messaging and scheduling in one platform, management tools with integrated communication can simplify case processes for both clients and workers. Platforms such as Casebook allow clients to ask questions, reschedule appointments, submit documents, and more, all from the website or app. Plus, they can select their preferred contact method, such as phone calls or emails, to be reached more efficiently. For caseworkers, integrated communication helps when reviewing case management plans. Instead of filtering through email and text inboxes, you can find all of a client's messages and appointment notes within one interface. This ensures no messages are missed and maintains a thorough paper trail moving forward, such as for incident management. The Casebook app will even notify you about new messages and case updates based on your user settings. 7. Reporting and Analytics Reporting and analytics are key case management system features, helping you create efficient resolutions and care plans based on all available data. A platform's analytics shouldn't be the dominant influence when determining management models. However, dependable analyses are often beneficial for larger files, newer clients, and complicated cases. They can also help you avoid bias and human error. For the sake of reliability, you should use a case management system with robust reporting features. Casebook's reporting process quickly compiles all relevant client information into easy-to-read reports that meet industry standards. By automatically adapting client files into digestible reports, you can skip many administrative tasks and gauge your case's information more clearly. These reports are also beneficial for collaborating, sharing case details, and tracking progress.
by Trevor Norkey 27 min read

How School-Based Case Managers Can Prepare for the New School Year

While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School...
While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need. While the beginning of the new school year can be a time of excitement, hope, and anticipation, it can also conjure up apprehension, uncertainty, and anxiety. Schools are facing big challenges, from lack of funding and outdated policies to safety issues to rising student mental health issues. School-Based Clinical Social Workers (CSWs), or School Social Workers (SSWs), are increasingly being called upon to help pick up the slack. SSWs not only case manage, assess risks and needs, and make referrals to other agencies and providers; they also to provide interventions, such as ongoing therapy. They are tasked with assessing, diagnosing, and treating students with mental and emotional health conditions, serious behavior issues, homelessness, severe trauma, family crises, and more. SSWs are expected to help schools to address: The continuing effects of the pandemic, which hit many students hard The need for interventions and learning recovery Significant attendance issues Behavior problems, including disrespect, defiance, refusal, fighting, bullying, cyberbullying, and violence Ongoing and increasing student mental and emotional health challenges Each year, schools are relying more and more upon SSWs as vital extensions of their staff. SSWs’ caseloads and responsibilities continue to grow, and there’s often a waiting list of students requiring their services. What Can School-Based CSWs, SSWs and CMs Do To Prepare for the New School Year? For SSWs returning to campuses this school year, preparation is key. Of course, all schools and districts are different and have varied needs, but those needs appear to be immense and complex. It’s important to gain some clarity on what those needs are and what exactly your role will be, to have a good idea of what to expect, and have a solid plan. Here are some ideas and considerations for preparing for a successful school year. Logistics Know your school (or schools), the environment, culture, climate, procedures, schedules, and needs. Familiarize yourself with the campus, safety protocols, and staff. Understand who does what, and who your direct contact/s at the school will be. Figure out how you can best work together. Also, be sure that you have what you need, a quiet space that’s big enough and comfortable, and the necessary equipment, technology, tools, and supplies. If possible, schedule a brief meeting with key team members before or soon after school starts. You may also want to take a tour, take possession of keys (to the front gate, your office, the restroom, etc.), familiarize yourself with emergency plans, school maps and bell schedules (on regular, minimum, exam days, etc.), disciplinary rules, and so forth. Know how you will call for students to come to meet with you, how long sessions will be, and what if any passes or forms you will need.
by Lori Granieri 9 min read

Buy or Build Your Own Case Management System for Human Services?

You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to p...
You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list. You run a social services organization and you're keeping all of your records in a spreadsheet, and now you are wondering if the investment in a case management solution is right for you. You're probably already having trouble getting the reports you need and making informed decisions about how to provide the best outcomes for your clients. How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing How easy will it be to find information in the case of an audit? How quickly can you show your impact in the community and product reports for your funders? Now is the time to decide if investing some more into your existing spreadsheet and paper-based system makes sense or if it's time to upgrade to a full-fledged human services software system. After speaking with hundreds (and possibly thousands) of organizations offering various impactful services to their communities, I have observed specific patterns of data that are vital to any case management record. Each organization is unique, and like your own, they each have specific data points that are required for their particular field. The general patterns hold that the points I’m about to discuss are uniform with the majority of social service programs in need of case management. By using this information, you can start to built out your existing system or make an informed decision if moving toward a SaaS platform for social services is a more efficient option. Vital Components People. At its core, human services are about humans. This should be the foundational piece of your records. People are why you do what you do, therefore they are the most vital aspect of your record keeping. While the person can be broken down into various categories (i.e. demographics, personal history, income status, needs, etc.), you need, at the very least, an identifying device. Whether that’s a name or an ID Number is completely up to you, but you must be able to signify those people with whom and for whom you are working. Services. The second most important data point required for case management is the services being provided for those individuals with whom you are working. Recording those multiple ways you help your clients can begin to create a visible pattern of successful versus unsuccessful outcomes, as well as give context to the support you’re raising. Elements needed in recording services should be: The service name/type The duration of that service Any interactions between the client and the service (i.e. attendance, visits, etc.) Other details such as who administered the service, outcomes of that service, etc. are also helpful data elements to collect. Notes. Collecting a historical list of all interactions with clients is paramount when collaborating on casework. This limits the duplication of services and conversations. It also protects your organization from false accusations and audits. Having a singular vantage point of all of these case notes is incredibly valuable, especially when compared to adding sticky notes to a paper folder. Notes should include: The author of that note A roster of people involved in the note (Clients, caseworkers, family members in attendance at a meeting, as an example) Date and time stamps on the interaction discussed in the case note The note itself This is an area where meticulous record keeping is very important. For example, if someone is moved from one care facility to another, but forgets to make the first placement as "closed", there could be confusion about who is where. This is mitigated in automated human services databases. Documents and Forms. Love them or hate them, forms and documents are a vital part of every caseworker’s life. Whether you’re using a physical paper system or a digital solution, you need forms for intake, agreements, background checks, assessments, service agreements, surveys, and copies of vital records, and more. The good news is that they serve the purpose of keeping your work above reproach when audited. They also allow your team to coordinate efforts in helping others. Many organizations invest in a high-quality paper filing system with well thought out Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) about where the files are stored, who can check them out, and what happens when someone leaves the organization but fails to return a client's folder. Another option is a cloud drive like Dropbox or Google Drive. You can organize clients into folders and then search when looking for something. Google drive even can search the contents of a PDF or image file. Other organizations choose to use a person-centric social services platform to keep these documents and forms in a digital format, so they can be stored indefinitely in a HIPAA-compliant secure repository. Other Communications. Have you communicated with your client by text message (SMS) or email? Be sure to have a process in place to retain these communications and to access them as they are needed. One way is to create a folder and then create a rule in your email client ("filters" in Gmail) to organize your communications with each client. This can quickly get overwhelming but it gets the job done for smaller organizations that don't have a lot of client growth. As mentioned above, these are only the essential components of casework. A list of nice-to-haves would include items such as employee management, easy-to-follow workflows, task management, and a way to make sure every meeting is synchronized with your phone's calendar. Every human service organization has unique needs, so you can surely think of a few more things that we've left off the list.
by Andrew Pelletier 20 min read

Enhancing Participant Connections for Human Services Nonprofits with Case Management Software

In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management soft...
In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member. In this article, we will explore some foundational ways that case management software can help your organization establish and enhance participant connections with the use of technology. How Does Case Management Software Enhance Participant Connection? Enhanced Client Tracking Client management software allows clients to fill out vital profile information (such as the demographics your company uses in reporting), access their information, and finish different forms, tests, and surveys whenever and wherever they like. This way, your organization can track and maintain vital client data, including contact details, case histories, and demographics. This makes it much simpler for you to contact participants by enabling staff to send an email and text alerts straight from the system portal. For instance, with a few clicks, you can inform clients or other parties of a schedule change or ask them to take action. Easy Information Access Case management software allows nonprofit organizations and clients to access their profiles and other data easily. Individuals can gain knowledge from their prior contacts to respond in an informed and reasonable way. This is the ideal approach to increasing satisfaction and enhancing brand perception. clients are empowered by having access to tools and progress information because it gives them more control and understanding of their path. Giving clients control over their information boosts engagement inside your business and has the potential to directly influence and advance participants' goals. They may be more successful in the long run and be better able to see their development over time, thanks to the sense of ownership of their trip. Appointment Scheduling A case management system with an appointment scheduling tool can assist your organization in staying on top of appointments and ensuring they are attended. Clients can also plan appointments and view all current and previous appointments in one location, which makes it simpler to seek services, access information, and check notes. This simplifies the process of providing both virtual and physical services, lowering hurdles to service and facilitating connections between people and the assistance they require in a manner that suits them. Automation Recent reports indicate that several nonprofit organizations have reported that the need for their services has only continued to rise. Thus, it is no longer feasible to manually enroll this surge of new individuals. Digital intake forms can help capture vital data in minutes rather than taking hours to gather and input for each new member.
by Casebook Editorial Team 8 min read

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