How Can Workflows Support Home Visits?

by Maryellen Hess Cameron

Home Visit Workflows

A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. 

Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns.

This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. 

Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email.

Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps!

You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. 

Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool  to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration.

A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration. A workflow is a management tool that both leaders and case managers can use to follow best practices. As the word suggests it is something like a flow chart. It documents a series of steps or tasks you need to complete. It adapts well to the process you must follow for making home visits as part of child welfare services. It can involve different people, tools, and resources. Case management platforms like Casebook provide a workflow builder a case worker with basic computer skills can use to design a helpful process. Leaders can set them up to establish a standardized process they want all workers to follow. This applies to any type of home visit that is needed, whether it is part of a basic child wellness strategy or a response to reports by others who have concerns. This is particularly critical when the federal government updates it rules and guidance for child welfare services. In fact, in November 2023 the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services issued new rules for Titles IV-B and IV-E of the Social Security Act. Child service providers for children and youth in foster care must collaborate with educational agencies. Leaders can insure compliance simply by adding new steps to their standard workflows. This simplifies their oversight. Requirements to collaborate with community-based and government agencies are not new. Given the number of entities in your community that may be part of the child welfare system this could get complicated. Efficient case management software will help you organize and coordinate services with your collaborators. You can even set up workflows for the processes your agency has for creating and maintaining each one. You can use calendar functions to plan homes visits and follow-up activities you do by phone or email. Another advantage for overworked case managers: automate repeating steps in your processes. Workflows can trigger the system to complete certain steps for you, such as populating information based on a value you assign in the workflow’s design. Say you work with a particular agency frequently. You can assign that agency’s name as a trigger that automatically fills in its service type, license type and its status, and the contact person. That eliminates four steps! You can use workflows as a task checklist for each process. When you set up the workflow it can create a list of all tasks that you need to work through in a particular order. They can be established as recurring or one-time tasks. When you open or update a record you can choose only those tasks that are pertinent for that individual case. Supervisors can use the workflow as a staff planning tool to assign cases to people. Case managers can use the Assignee field for tracking who will perform other tasks in a collaboration.

Common Workflow Needs

Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions.

Referral:

Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file.

There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. 

Investigation

As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party,  who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome.

Assessment

What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics.  

You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions.

As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. 

Case Planning and Goal Setting

In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. 

Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case.

Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case. Child welfare cases have multiple steps, each of which may have relevant tasks and data collection needs. The agency can define a workflow for each step. You can connect data to a given step, such as a link to a stored document. This will keep your organized despite heavy caseloads and deadlines for completing certain actions. Referral: Research into a family’s history may be your first step when you receive a referral. If your agency uses a case management system you can start with searching internal records to find out whether there have been previous reports about the family’s welfare. Even if the case was originally closed as unsubstantiated additional reports may suggest more is going on that it appeared to be during earlier inquiries. If you make inquiries of other agencies that take reports you can scan their responses and upload them to the case file. There is value in a client record beyond any history of child welfare reports. A record for any social services your agency provided to a family will have basic data. You can review any historical information although you will want to bring your own perspectives to the case. Still, it never hurts to have another professional’s observations. Investigation As readers know, investigations start with a referral from a concerned party, who may be a teacher, neighbor, health care provider or as a part of a routine wellness check. Agency policies, governing rules, and legislation can establish what kind of reports warrant an investigation. Your agency’s case management system (whether it is computer based or uses paper records) should include fields that you use to document the incident and its characteristics. A strict process for this decision and the documentation for it may be a critical factor if a complaint is made later that the decision led to a poor outcome. Assessment What are the factors you consider in assessing a child’s well-being? A workflow can keep your on track for each factor. You will need to work your way through them deliberately, so that you do not overlook any considerations, such as family characteristics and dynamics. You can also work in the interview questions you will pose with the family, close friends and others who may have relevant information. If you set up an interview workflow you can replicate it within the case record for each person your interview. They may include different types of questions. For example, the interview with a parent may look different from the interview with a teacher. Workflows allow you to pick and choose the relevant questions. As mentioned above, case management systems like Casebook give you the ability to scan and upload documents to the file. This extends to photos or videos you may take and audio files for the interviews. If you use standardized assessment tools you can add paper forms by uploading them, or add a link to the tool from the individual case record. Case Planning and Goal Setting In addition to your case notes you can use a workflow you will follow for reaching the case goal. Workflows can be edited to update them as case plans or goals evolve. Workflows keep you organized and efficient across all processes you need to complete. They document that you followed all of the required steps whether they are for internal purposes or compliance. The case management functions in the platform help you maintain an accurate account of all of the information you have collected, the interventions you proposed and implemented and the outcomes. Home visits can be tense. It is not always clear whether your observations warrant further investigations. Workflows can keep you grounded and objective to make the best possible decision for the child whose welfare is at the center of the case.

Discover the Transformative Power Casebook Can Provide to Your Organization

Maryellen Hess Cameron
Maryellen Hess Cameron spent over 25 years as the Executive Director of non-profit agencies in the social